Ki no Tsurayuki

Ki no Tsurayuki


Born
Japan
Died
June 10, 0945


Ki no Tsurayuki (紀 貫之, 872 – June 30, 945) was a Japanese author, poet and courtier of the Heian period. He is best known as the principal compiler of the Kokin Wakashū and as a possible author of the Tosa Diary, although this was published anonymously.

Tsurayuki was a son of Ki no Mochiyuki. In the 890s he became a poet of waka, short poems composed in Japanese. In 905, under the order of Emperor Daigo, he was one of four poets selected to compile the Kokin Wakashū, the first imperially-sponsored anthology (chokusen-shū) of waka poetry.

After holding a few offices in Kyoto, he was appointed the provincial governor of Tosa province and stayed there from 930 until 935. Later he was presumably appointed the provincial governor of Suo province,
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Average rating: 3.91 · 639 ratings · 37 reviews · 11 distinct works
The Tosa Diary

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3.25 avg rating — 116 ratings — published 935 — 11 editions
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Kokinshu: A Collection of P...

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4.30 avg rating — 60 ratings — published 905 — 4 editions
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土佐日記 蜻蛉日記 紫式部日記 更級日記

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Log of a Japanese Journey f...

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The Kokin Wakashu in Japane...

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Log of a Japanese Journey f...

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土佐日記 貫之集

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Japansk lyrik för tusen år ...

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3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1953
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Anthology of Japanese Liter...

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4.01 avg rating — 486 ratings — published 1955 — 18 editions
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Ise Monogatari: The Tales o...

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3.76 avg rating — 127 ratings — published 1900 — 9 editions
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More books by Ki no Tsurayuki…
“The songs of Japan take the human heart as their seed and flourish as myriad leaves of words. As long as they are alive to this world, the cares and deeds of men and women are endless, so they speak of things they hear and see, giving words to the feelings in their hearts. Hearing the cries of the warbler among the blossoms or the calls of the frog that lives in the waters, how can we doubt that every living creature sing its song? Not using force, it moves heaven and earth, makes even the unseen spirits and gods feel pity, smoothes the bonds between man and woman, and consoles the hearts of fierce warriors-such a thing is poetry.”
Ki no Tsurayuki, Anthology of Japanese Literature: From the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century

“En tunne enää
ystäväni sydäntä.
Vain luumunkukat
yhä tuoksuvat niin kuin
tuoksuivat kerran ennen.”
Ki no Tsurayuki

“Once again 'the passenger' spoke, lamenting that (the voyage) had lasted into this month, and for the many hardships they had endured, to which the others agreed. Out of the fullness of his heart he recited this: Though the days in spring Grow as long as is the rope Used to tow our boat, Forty days we've spent,—maybe Fifty days upon the sea. People who hear this will say to themselves that this kind of stuff is very poor. But the passenger produced it with a good deal of difficulty and thought it pretty good; so they should stop whispering such cruel things about it.”
Ki no Tsurayuki, The Tosa Diary

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