Maia Szalavitz

Goodreads Author


Born
The United States
Genre

Member Since
November 2015


Maia Szalavitz is an award-winning author and journalist who covers addiction and neuroscience. Her next book, Unbroken Brain (St. Martins, April, 2016), uses her own story of recovery from heroin and cocaine addiction to explore how reframing addiction as a developmental disorder could revolutionize prevention, treatment and policy.

She's the author or co-author of six previous books, including the bestselling The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog (Basic, 2007) and Born for Love: Why Empathy Is Essential-- and Endangered (Morrow, 2010), both with leading child psychiatrist and trauma expert Bruce D. Perry, MD, PhD.

Her book, Help at Any Cost: How the Troubled-Teen Industry Cons Parents and Hurts Kids, is the first history of systemic abuse in "tou
...more

Average rating: 4.33 · 14,961 ratings · 1,546 reviews · 11 distinct worksSimilar authors
Unbroken Brain: A Revolutio...

4.14 avg rating — 859 ratings — published 2016 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Help at Any Cost: How the T...

4.29 avg rating — 147 ratings — published 2006 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Intense Worlds

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2013
Rate this book
Clear rating
How Oxytocin Helps Men Stay...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013
Rate this book
Clear rating
Het Liefdevolle Brein

by
it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2010
Rate this book
Clear rating
Clean - Sucht verstehen und...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Lost Boy

by
3.85 avg rating — 3,097 ratings — published 2009 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Boy Who Was Raised as a...

by
4.51 avg rating — 10,718 ratings — published 2006 — 36 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Born for Love: Why Empathy ...

by
4.29 avg rating — 1,160 ratings — published 2010 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
El chico al que criaron com...

by
4.44 avg rating — 9 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Maia Szalavitz…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“Whatever the evolutionary precursors of drug use are, a permanently “drug-free” human culture has yet to be discovered. Like music, language, art, and tool use, the pursuit of altered states of consciousness is a human universal. With access to few alternatives, Siberian shamans imbibe reindeer and human urine to maximize the psychedelic yield of Amanita muscaria mushrooms (the metabolite that is excreted may be stronger than the substance initially ingested); on nearly the opposite side of the world, New Zealanders party with untested “research chemicals” synthesized by Chinese chemists. Drug use spans time and culture. It is a rare human who has never taken a drug to alter her mood; statistically, it is non-users who are abnormal. Indeed, today, around two thirds of Americans over 12 have had at least one drink in the last year, and 1 in 5 are current smokers. (In the 1940s and ’50s, a whopping 67% of men smoked.) Among people ages 21 to 25, 60% have taken an illegal drug at least once—overwhelmingly marijuana—and 20% have taken one in the past month. Moreover, around half of us could suffer from physical withdrawal symptoms if denied our daily coffee. While Americans are relatively prodigious drug users—topping the charts in the use of many substances—we are far from alone in our psychoactive predilections.”
Maia Szalavitz, Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction

“Being bold and adventurous and being sad and cautious seem like opposite personality types. However, these two paths to addiction are actually not mutually exclusive. The third way involves having both kinds of traits, where people alternatively fear and desire novelty and behavior swings from being impulsive and rash to being compulsive, fear driven, and stuck in rigid patterns. This is where some of the contradictions that have long confounded the study of addiction come into play—namely, some aspects seem precisely planned out, while others are obviously related to lack of restraint. My own story spirals around this paradoxical situation: I was driven enough to excel academically and fundamentally scared of change and of other people—yet I was also reckless enough to sell cocaine and shoot heroin.”
Maia Szalavitz, Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction

“good decisions aren’t always made for healthy reasons.”
Maia Szalavitz, Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
Aussie Readers: **Winter Reading Challenge - 2012** 470 294 Sep 20, 2012 05:40PM  



No comments have been added yet.