Susan A. Greenfield


Born
in The United Kingdom
October 01, 1950

Genre


Greenfield is Professor of Synaptic Pharmacology at Lincoln College, Oxford. On 1 February 2006, she was installed as Chancellor of Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. Until 8 January 2010, she was director of the Royal Institution of Great Britain

Average rating: 3.56 · 1,574 ratings · 197 reviews · 24 distinct worksSimilar authors
Mind Change: How Digital Te...

3.69 avg rating — 484 ratings — published 2014 — 11 editions
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The Private Life of the Bra...

3.55 avg rating — 293 ratings — published 2000 — 9 editions
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The Human Brain: A Guided Tour

3.72 avg rating — 250 ratings — published 1997 — 3 editions
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A Day in the Life of the Br...

3.60 avg rating — 102 ratings — published 2016 — 6 editions
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2121: A Tale From the Next ...

2.82 avg rating — 90 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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ID: The Quest for Meaning i...

3.33 avg rating — 85 ratings — published 2008 — 6 editions
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Brain Story: Unlocking Your...

4.30 avg rating — 46 ratings — published 2000 — 5 editions
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You and Me: The Neuroscienc...

3.11 avg rating — 55 ratings — published 2011 — 7 editions
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Tomorrow's People: How 21st...

3.35 avg rating — 49 ratings — published 2003 — 5 editions
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The Human Mind Explained: A...

4.06 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1996 — 3 editions
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“The more connections you can make across an ever wider and more disparate range of knowledge, the more deeply you will understand something. Search engines and videogames do not provide that facility; nothing does, other than your own brain.”
Susan A. Greenfield, Mind Change: How Digital Technologies Are Leaving Their Mark on Our Brains

“that e-reading resulted in poorer comprehension, as a result of the physical limitations of the text that forced readers to scroll up and down, thereby disrupting their reading with a spatial instability”
Susan A. Greenfield, Mind Change: How Digital Technologies Are Leaving Their Mark on Our Brains

“Digital Native born then could read and write, email (which started around 1993) would have become an inescapable part of life. The important distinction is that Digital Natives know no other way of life other than the culture of Internet, laptop, and mobile. They can be freed from the constraints of local mores and hierarchical authority and, as autonomous citizens of the world, will personalize screen-based activities and services while collaborating with, and contributing to, global social networks and information sources.”
Susan A. Greenfield, Mind Change: How Digital Technologies Are Leaving Their Mark on Our Brains

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