Gino Segrè


Born
Florence, Italy
Website


Professor emeritus who started teaching at the University of Pennsylvania in 1967. Pursued with enthusiasm and considerable a career as a high-energy elementary particle theorist with a side interest in astrophysics.

A long-term interest in history led to his first book, a tale of temperature in all its broad ramifications.

Average rating: 3.82 · 3,458 ratings · 441 reviews · 12 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Pope of Physics: Enrico...

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4.28 avg rating — 614 ratings — published 2016 — 13 editions
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Faust in Copenhagen: A Stru...

3.97 avg rating — 359 ratings — published 2007 — 15 editions
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A Matter of Degrees: What T...

3.97 avg rating — 188 ratings — published 2002 — 4 editions
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Ordinary Geniuses: Max Delb...

4.01 avg rating — 84 ratings — published 2011 — 5 editions
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Einstein's Refrigerator: Ta...

3.63 avg rating — 51 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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Il Papa della fisica: Enric...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Sul Deposito Irregolare in ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
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Sulla Natura del Compossess...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
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Sull'et� Dei Giudizii Di Bu...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
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Ondo Kara Mita Uchū Busshit...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2004
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More books by Gino Segrè…
“Some individuals have the courage to make it, even feel the need to do so; for them the quest is a necessity, not an option. Most people setting out on such journeys are never heard from again, but part of the romance of any field lies in keeping the dream alive, in not settling for what is familiar and comfortable.”
Gino Segre, Ordinary Geniuses: Max Delbruck, George Gamow, and the Origins of Genomics andBig Bang Cosmology

“Clausius summarized his application of entropy to thermodynamics in two dramatic phrases that had a big impact at the time. They were (1) First Law: The energy of the universe is constant, and (2) Second Law: The entropy of the universe tends to a maximum.”
Gino Segrè, A Matter of Degrees: What Temperature Reveals about the Past and Future of Our Species, Planet, and Universe

“Returning from Germany to Italy in late summer of 1923, Fermi found his interest turning increasingly to statistical mechanics, a subject that would allow”
Gino Segrè, The Pope of Physics: Enrico Fermi and the Birth of the Atomic Age



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