Alex Christofi

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Alex Christofi was born in Dorset and read English at Oxford University. As well as working as an editor, he writes occasional essays and reviews. His first novel Glass, was longlisted for the Desmond Elliott Prize and won the Betty Trask Prize. His second novel, Let Us Be True, is out now.

Average rating: 3.24 · 224 ratings · 40 reviews · 4 distinct worksSimilar authors
Glass

3.11 avg rating — 170 ratings — published 2015 — 5 editions
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Let Us Be True

3.65 avg rating — 54 ratings — published 2017 — 4 editions
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Mr. Glas: Roman

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Transparence

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* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

How to win at literature

This essay was first published in Issue 3 of the Brixton Review of Books in September 2018.

On the evening of 5th July 2018, carefully selected guests filtered into Buckingham Palace for dinner with Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall. You might say that the invitation list had started to be compiled fifty years previously. There were ten authors present, oddly biased towards the first half of the alp...

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Published on February 01, 2019 06:46

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How to win at literature

This essay was first published in Issue 3 of the Brixton Review of Books in September 2018. On the evening of 5th July 2018, carefully selected gue... Read more of this blog post »
Let Us Be True by Alex Christofi
“He’d seen for the first time how easily one might neglect those one loved by chasing the big story, the big lie that history was a matter of ideals and not compassion.”
Alex Christofi
More of Alex's books…
“He’d seen for the first time how easily one might neglect those one loved by chasing the big story, the big lie that history was a matter of ideals and not compassion.”
Alex Christofi, Let Us Be True

“We may struggle one way but we are all being dragged another by our heritage, by history.”
Alex Christofi, Let Us Be True

“As he heard a brief click, Ralf thought about what had happened in that moment which had already passed. For just one hundredth of a second, the shutter had opened and photons had flooded into the dark box. They did not move in lines but everywhere at once, so that some might have travelled from Ralf’s face to the end of the beach and back. They went so quickly that, from the perspective of light, the rest of the universe remained at a standstill.

For Ralf and Elsa, time was slipping by irrecoverably, but for that single hundredth of a second, the celluloid recorded its bombardment, like the sooty negatives of objects and people, scorched onto the façades of buildings in bombings. The celluloid had ceased to interact with the world, a carpaccio of time, a leaf of the past brought into the present, where Ralf and Elsa stood together, still.”
Alex Christofi, Let Us Be True

Topics Mentioning This Author

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All About Books: 2015 Bingo Challenge 982 597 Jan 03, 2016 01:50PM  
“He’d seen for the first time how easily one might neglect those one loved by chasing the big story, the big lie that history was a matter of ideals and not compassion.”
Alex Christofi, Let Us Be True

“We may struggle one way but we are all being dragged another by our heritage, by history.”
Alex Christofi, Let Us Be True

“As he heard a brief click, Ralf thought about what had happened in that moment which had already passed. For just one hundredth of a second, the shutter had opened and photons had flooded into the dark box. They did not move in lines but everywhere at once, so that some might have travelled from Ralf’s face to the end of the beach and back. They went so quickly that, from the perspective of light, the rest of the universe remained at a standstill.

For Ralf and Elsa, time was slipping by irrecoverably, but for that single hundredth of a second, the celluloid recorded its bombardment, like the sooty negatives of objects and people, scorched onto the façades of buildings in bombings. The celluloid had ceased to interact with the world, a carpaccio of time, a leaf of the past brought into the present, where Ralf and Elsa stood together, still.”
Alex Christofi, Let Us Be True




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