John A.C. Hattie



Average rating: 4.13 · 2,038 ratings · 209 reviews · 29 distinct worksSimilar authors
Visible Learning for Teache...

4.05 avg rating — 764 ratings — published 2011 — 17 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Visible Learning: A Synthes...

4.16 avg rating — 424 ratings — published 2008 — 12 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Visible Learning and the Sc...

by
4.30 avg rating — 222 ratings — published 2013 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Visible Learning for Mathem...

by
4.16 avg rating — 98 ratings7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
10 Mindframes for Visible L...

by
4.04 avg rating — 55 ratings7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Visible Learning Into Actio...

3.61 avg rating — 31 ratings — published 2015 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Self-Concept

3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1991 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
ACTIVATE: A Leader's Guide ...

by
3.67 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
International Guide to Stud...

by
really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2012 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Visible Learning Insights

by
0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by John A.C. Hattie…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“The aim is to get the students actively involved in seeking this evidence: their role is not simply to do tasks as decided by teachers, but to actively manage and understand their learning gains. This includes evaluating their own progress, being more responsible for their learning, and being involved with peers in learning together about gains in learning. If students are to become active evaluators of their own progress, teachers must provide the students with appropriate feedback so that they can engage in this task. Van den Bergh, Ros, and Beijaard (2010: 3) describe the task thus: Fostering active learning seems a very challenging and demanding task for teachers, requiring knowledge of students’ learning processes, skills in providing guidance and feedback and classroom management. The need is to engage students in this same challenging and demanding task. The suggestion in this chapter is to start lessons with helping students to understand the intention of the lesson and showing them what success might look like at the end. Many times, teachers look for the interesting beginning to a lesson – for the hook, and the motivating question. Dan Willingham (2009) has provided an excellent argument for not thinking in this way. He advocates starting with what the student is likely to think about. Interesting hooks, demonstrations, fascinating facts, and likewise may seem to be captivating (and often are), but he suggests that there are likely to be other parts of the lesson that are more suitable for the attention-grabber. The place for the attention-grabber is more likely to be at the end of the lesson, because this will help to consolidate what has been learnt. Most importantly,Willingham asks teachers to think long and hard about how to make the connection between the attention-grabber and the point that it is designed to make; preferably, that point will be the main idea from the lesson. Having too many open-ended activities (discovery learning, searching the Internet, preparing PowerPoint presentations) can make it difficult to direct students’ attention to that which matters – because they often love to explore the details, the irrelevancies, and the unimportant while doing these activities. One of Willingham's principles is that any teaching method is most useful when there is plenty of prompt feedback about whether the student is thinking about a problem in the right way. Similarly, he promotes the notion that assignments should be primarily about what the teacher wants the students to think about (not about demonstrating ‘what they know’). Students are very good at ignoring what you say (‘I value connections, deep ideas, your thoughts’) and seeing what you value (corrections to the grammar, comments on referencing, correctness or absence of facts). Thus teachers must develop a scoring rubric for any assignment before they complete the question or prompts, and show the rubric to the students so that they know what the teacher values. Such formative feedback can reinforce the ‘big ideas’ and the important understandings, and help to make the investment of”
John A.C. Hattie, Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning

“Across the grades, when instruction was challenging, relevant, and academically demanding, then all students had higher engagement and teachers talked less – and the greatest beneficiaries were at-risk students.”
John A.C. Hattie, Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning

“It is incumbent therefore upon schools to attend to student friendships, to ensure that the class makes newcomers welcomed, and, at minimum, to ensure that all students have a sense of belonging.”
John A.C. Hattie, Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite John to Goodreads.