Karyn Pearson

more photos (1)

Megan M...
259 books | 49 friends

Brittany
628 books | 50 friends

Crystal...
6,994 books | 2,810 friends

Beth Ba...
594 books | 4,143 friends

John Fe...
83 books | 142 friends

Joe Chi...
126 books | 216 friends

AmyBeth...
152 books | 218 friends

Catrina...
414 books | 921 friends

More friends…

Karyn Pearson

Goodreads Author


Born
in Honolulu, The United States
Twitter

Genre

Influences

Member Since
May 2013


Karyn Pearson is the author of the Hellfire Trilogy and Arcturian Bloodlines. She is a full-time pet parent of her two dogs Nikki and Jamie. Karyn has a B.A. in Anthropology and has explored dozens of cultures in her studies, but has imagined countless more. She enjoys reading, playing action RPGs, and plotting the next adventure for her characters whenever she has a spare moment free of the dreaded and undefeated "puppy dog eyes attack."

Her upcoming project will be the first novel of a new vampire series, Arcturian Bloodlines. When she's not writing, Karyn can be found playing with her puppies or Googling various dangerous topics for novel research that make her constantly question why federal agents haven't yet knocked down her front door
...more

Average rating: 4.31 · 45 ratings · 10 reviews · 5 distinct works
Spark (Hellfire Trilogy Boo...

4.24 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 2013 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Inferno (Hellfire Trilogy B...

4.30 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Hunters' Assessment

4.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Embers (Hellfire Trilogy Bo...

by
4.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Newfoundland Vampire

by
3.51 avg rating — 65 ratings — published 2012 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Karyn Pearson…
Spark Inferno Embers
(3 books)
by
4.28 avg rating — 40 ratings

Herman Melville
“It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.”
Herman Melville

Edgar Allan Poe
“I became insane, with long intervals of horrible sanity.”
Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe
“All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream.”
Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe
“Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
Tis some visitor," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door —
Only this, and nothing more."

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December,
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow; — vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow — sorrow for the lost Lenore —
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore —
Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me — filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating,
Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door —
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; —
This it is, and nothing more."

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
Sir," said I, "or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you"— here I opened wide the door; —
Darkness there, and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortals ever dared to dream before;
But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,
And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, "Lenore?"
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, "Lenore!" —
Merely this, and nothing more.

Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
Surely," said I, "surely that is something at my window lattice:
Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore —
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; —
'Tis the wind and nothing more."

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore;
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door —
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door —
Perched, and sat, and nothing more.

Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore.
Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou," I said, "art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the Nightly shore —
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!"
Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."

Much I marveled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning— little relevancy bore;
For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
Ever yet was blest with seeing bird above his chamber door —
Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
With such name as "Nevermore.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven

Edgar Allan Poe
“It was many and many a year ago,
In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of ANNABEL LEE;
And this maiden she lived with no other thought
Than to love and be loved by me.

I was a child and she was a child,
In this kingdom by the sea;
But we loved with a love that was more than love-
I and my Annabel Lee;
With a love that the winged seraphs of heaven
Coveted her and me.

And this was the reason that, long ago,
In this kingdom by the sea,
A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling
My beautiful Annabel Lee;
So that her highborn kinsman came
And bore her away from me,
To shut her up in a sepulchre
In this kingdom by the sea.

The angels, not half so happy in heaven,
Went envying her and me-
Yes!- that was the reason (as all men know,
In this kingdom by the sea)
That the wind came out of the cloud by night,
Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee.

But our love it was stronger by far than the love
Of those who were older than we-
Of many far wiser than we-
And neither the angels in heaven above,
Nor the demons down under the sea,
Can ever dissever my soul from the soul
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee.

For the moon never beams without bringing me dreams
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And the stars never rise but I feel the bright eyes
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side
Of my darling- my darling- my life and my bride,
In the sepulchre there by the sea,
In her tomb by the sounding sea.”
Edgar Allen Poe

220 Goodreads Librarians Group — 131334 members — last activity 6 minutes ago
A place where all Goodreads members can work together to improve the Goodreads book catalog. Non-librarians are welcome to join the group as well, to ...more
25x33 Distinguished Press - Series Reads — 6 members — last activity Feb 02, 2014 02:49PM
Distinguished Press is a series oriented publisher. We also have imprints that publish Young Adult, New Adult and Children's books. ...more



No comments have been added yet.