Thomas Gilovich


Born
January 01, 1954

Website

Genre


From Wikipedia:

Thomas D. Gilovich (born 1954) is a professor of psychology at Cornell University who has researched decision making and behavioral economics and has written popular books on said subjects. He has collaborated with Daniel Kahneman, Lee Ross and Amos Tversky.

Gilovich earned his B.A. from the University of California, Santa Barbara and his Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University in 1981.
...more

Average rating: 3.96 · 5,957 ratings · 320 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
How We Know What Isn't So: ...

3.96 avg rating — 2,953 ratings — published 1991 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Wisest One in the Room:...

by
3.81 avg rating — 923 ratings — published 2015 — 16 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Heuristics and Biases: The ...

by
4.39 avg rating — 470 ratings — published 2002 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Social Psychology

by
3.81 avg rating — 185 ratings — published 1998 — 29 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Social Psychology: Instruct...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2006
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ningen Kono Shinji Ya Sukim...

by
did not like it 1.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1993
Rate this book
Clear rating
Study Guide To Accompany So...

did not like it 1.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
Why Smart People Make Big M...

by
3.96 avg rating — 1,421 ratings — published 1999 — 14 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Thomas Gilovich…
“When examining evidence relevant to a given belief, people are inclined to see what they expect to see, and conclude what they expect to conclude. Information that is consistent with our pre-existing beliefs is often accepted at face value, whereas evidence that contradicts them is critically scrutinized and discounted. Our beliefs may thus be less responsive than they should to the implications of new information”
Thomas Gilovich, How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life

“People will always prefer black-and-white over shades of grey, and so there will always be the temptation to hold overly-simplified beliefs and to hold them with excessive confidence”
Thomas Gilovich, How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life

“What we believe is heavily influenced by what we think others believe”
Thomas Gilovich, How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
The Next Best Boo...: The Title Game - Part Deux 8240 2579 7 minutes ago  


Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Thomas to Goodreads.