Walter Sinnott-Armstrong


Genre


Average rating: 3.67 · 1,154 ratings · 136 reviews · 29 distinct worksSimilar authors
Think Again: How to Reason ...

3.41 avg rating — 307 ratings9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Understanding Arguments: An...

by
3.61 avg rating — 171 ratings — published 1978 — 13 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Morality Without God?

3.53 avg rating — 192 ratings — published 2009 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Moral Psychology, Volume 1:...

4.29 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Moral Psychology, Volume 3:...

4.19 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Moral Psychology: The Cogni...

4.19 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Understanding Arguments, Co...

by
really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
Moral Skepticisms

4.25 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2006 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Moral Knowledge?: New Readi...

4.29 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Pyrrhonian Skepticism

3.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“Take a pinch of belief in God, add a dash of desire to experience God, stir in emotion to taste, and you have a recipe for religious experience.”
Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, God?: A Debate between a Christian and an Atheist

“The best way to reduce opponents’ overconfidence and make them open to your position might seem to be an overwhelming argument that shows them why they are wrong and why you are right. Sometimes that works, but only rarely. What usually works better is to ask questions—in particular, to ask opponents for reasons. Questions are often more powerful than assertions.”
Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Think Again: How to Reason and Argue

“God’s commands are arbitrary if He has no reason to command one act rather than another; but, if He does have reasons for His commands, then His reasons rather than His commands are what
make acts immoral.”
Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, God?: A Debate between a Christian and an Atheist



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Walter to Goodreads.