Jonathan Weiner


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Jonathan Weiner is one of the most distinguished popular-science writers in the country. His books have won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. A former editor at The Sciences and a writer for The New Yorker, he is the author of The Beak of the Finch, Time, Love, Memory, His Brother's Keeper among many others.

He currently lives in New York with his wife, Deborah Heiligman who is the children's book author, and their two sons. There he teaches science writing at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.
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Average rating: 4.09 · 11,029 ratings · 916 reviews · 17 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Beak of the Finch: A St...

4.17 avg rating — 8,531 ratings — published 1994 — 26 editions
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Time, Love, Memory: A Great...

4.18 avg rating — 794 ratings — published 1999 — 13 editions
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Long for This World: The St...

3.54 avg rating — 894 ratings — published 2010 — 10 editions
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His Brother's Keeper

3.75 avg rating — 255 ratings — published 2004 — 15 editions
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The Best American Science a...

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3.90 avg rating — 157 ratings — published 2005 — 2 editions
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The Next One Hundred Years

3.86 avg rating — 70 ratings6 editions
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Planet Earth

3.98 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 1986 — 6 editions
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Tranquil Aftermath

4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2006
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Il becco del fringuello Gio...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
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Inochi no bannin : Nanbyō...

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More books by Jonathan Weiner…
“It's almost as if each instant is our last and first. We are always dying, and always reborn. And that is living.”
Jonathan Weiner, Long For This World: The Strange Science of Immortality

“To suppose that the eye with all its inimitable contrivances for adjusting the focus to different distances, for admitting different amounts of light, and for the correction of spherical and chromatic aberration, could have been formed by natural selection, seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest degree,” he writes. But if we look at the whole tree of life, Darwin says, we can find innumerable gradations from extremely simple eyes consisting of hardly more than a nerveless cluster of pigment cells, which are rudimentary light sensors, to the marvels of the human eye, which are more impressive pieces of work than the human telescope.”
Jonathan Weiner, The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution in Our Time

“The lucky individual that finds a different seed, or nook, or niche, will fly up and out from beneath the Sisyphean rock of competition. It will tend to flourish and so will its descendants—that is, those that inherit the lucky character that had set it a little apart. Individuals that diverge from the madding crowd will tend to prosper, while the rest will be ground down.”
Jonathan Weiner, The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution in Our Time



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