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Scott Carney

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Scott Carney

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Born
in Providence, RI, The United States
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Member Since
May 2011


Scott Carney is an investigative journalist and anthropologist whose stories blend narrative non-fiction with ethnography. He has been a contributing editor at Wired and his work also appears in Mother Jones, Foreign Policy, Playboy, Details, Discover, Outside, and Fast Company. He regularly appears on variety of radio and television stations from NPR to National Geographic TV. In 2010 he won the Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism for the story “Meet the Parents” which tracked an international kidnapping-to-adoption ring . His first book, “The Red Market: On the Trail of the World’s Organ Brokers, Bone Thieves, Blood Farmers and Child Traffickers” was published by William Morrow in 2011 and won the 2012 Clarion Award for best non-fiction ...more

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Scott Carney Yes, that was me. I also did part of the credits where I impersonated the Count from sesame street.
Scott Carney Hi Kate, I don't know "Little Princes", but do recommend you check out the bibliography for The Red Market for further reading. There are a lot of gre…moreHi Kate, I don't know "Little Princes", but do recommend you check out the bibliography for The Red Market for further reading. There are a lot of great reads in there. (less)
Average rating: 4.01 · 10,236 ratings · 1,090 reviews · 15 distinct worksSimilar authors
What Doesn't Kill Us: How F...

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4.11 avg rating — 6,156 ratings — published 2017 — 27 editions
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The Red Market: On the Trai...

3.82 avg rating — 2,733 ratings — published 2011 — 6 editions
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The Wedge: Evolution, Consc...

4.04 avg rating — 520 ratings5 editions
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A Death on Diamond Mountain...

3.58 avg rating — 452 ratings — published 2015 — 9 editions
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Breath: The New Science of ...

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4.13 avg rating — 220 ratings
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The Vortex: A True Story of...

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4.47 avg rating — 124 ratings9 editions
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The Quick and Dirty Guide t...

3.80 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2014
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What Doesn't Kill Us / The ...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 13 ratings
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The Oxygen Advantage / What...

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Hyperion
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The Night Watchman
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Hyperion by Dan Simmons
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The Vortex by Scott Carney
"I don't know how or when I heard or read about this book. Its got everything. Yes it is a tale of global warming..Yes it brings back the memory Bangladesh. It brings back views of wars between ethnics. The backfill of Nixon-Kissingers ploy to bring i" Read more of this review »
The Vortex by Scott Carney
"In 1970, the Great Bhola Cyclone hit what was then East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). Half a million people were killed in the cyclone, but countless more died as a result of the, often purposely, terrible rescue efforts of the Pakistani government. Aft" Read more of this review »
The Vortex by Scott Carney
"Fascinating book. I had no idea of the levels of atrocities committed in the conflict between East and West Pakistan or the involvement of the U.S."
The Vortex by Scott Carney
" Thanks for noting that error in Kissinger's title. I will issue a correction for future editions. ...more "
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The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich
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Quotes by Scott Carney  (?)
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“much of the developing world—no longer suffers from diseases of deficiency. Instead we get the diseases of excess. This”
Scott Carney, What Doesn't Kill Us: How Freezing Water, Extreme Altitude, and Environmental Conditioning Will Renew Our Lost Evolutionary Strength

“Have you ever seen a rabbit go to a pharmacy, a hospital, or a mental asylum?” he asks rhetorically. “They don’t look for medicine, they heal themselves or die. Humans aren’t so simple; they’ve let technology get in the way of who they really are.” It’s an idea that I’ve thought a lot about, and one that doesn’t always sit comfortably. Yes the modern world has its drawbacks, but nature can also be brutal. So I interrupt the budding diatribe. “But rabbits get eaten by wolves,” I say. Hof doesn’t skip a beat at my interjection. “Yes, they know fight and flight. The wolf chases them and they die. But everything dies one day. It is just that in our case we aren’t eaten by wolves. Instead, without predators, we’re being eaten by cancer, by diabetes, and our own immune systems. There’s no wolf to run from, so our bodies eat themselves.”
Scott Carney, What Doesn't Kill Us: How Freezing Water, Extreme Altitude, and Environmental Conditioning Will Renew Our Lost Evolutionary Strength

“Every human alive today lives in a cocoon of consistency: an eternal summer. “We’re overlit, overfed, and overstimulated, and in terms of how long we’ve been on Earth, that’s all new,”
Scott Carney, What Doesn't Kill Us: How Freezing Water, Extreme Altitude, and Environmental Conditioning Will Renew Our Lost Evolutionary Strength

Topics Mentioning This Author

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“This is a short book because most books about writing are filled with bullshit. Fiction writers, present company included, don't understand very much about what they do -- not why it works when it's good, not why it doesn't when it's bad. I figured the shorter the book, the less bullshit."
Stephen King, On Writing
Stephen King

“But there was another option. He could choose to live in the world and guide other souls to enlightenment. Staying would mean never stepping through the door to Nirvana until every other living being was enlightened. It could take all eternity. No one knows how long it took him to make his decision. But Tibetans believe that he stayed. His realization made him a buddha—an enlightened being—but his choice also made him the first Bodhisattva:”
Scott Carney, A Death on Diamond Mountain: A True Story of Obsession, Madness, and the Path to Enlightenment

“Have you ever seen a rabbit go to a pharmacy, a hospital, or a mental asylum?” he asks rhetorically. “They don’t look for medicine, they heal themselves or die. Humans aren’t so simple; they’ve let technology get in the way of who they really are.” It’s an idea that I’ve thought a lot about, and one that doesn’t always sit comfortably. Yes the modern world has its drawbacks, but nature can also be brutal. So I interrupt the budding diatribe. “But rabbits get eaten by wolves,” I say. Hof doesn’t skip a beat at my interjection. “Yes, they know fight and flight. The wolf chases them and they die. But everything dies one day. It is just that in our case we aren’t eaten by wolves. Instead, without predators, we’re being eaten by cancer, by diabetes, and our own immune systems. There’s no wolf to run from, so our bodies eat themselves.”
Scott Carney, What Doesn't Kill Us: How Freezing Water, Extreme Altitude, and Environmental Conditioning Will Renew Our Lost Evolutionary Strength




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