Diriye Osman

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Diriye Osman

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Born
in Mogadishu, Somalia, Somalia
Website

Genre

Influences

Member Since
February 2013


Diriye Osman is a Somali-born, British short story writer and visual artist. His writing has appeared in 'Time Out', 'Attitude', 'Prospect', 'Poetry Review', 'Kwani?', 'Jungle Jim', 'Under The Influence' and 'SCARF Magazine'. His debut collection of short stories 'Fairytales For Lost Children' is published by Team Angelica Press in September.

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Diriye Osman Writer's block is oftentimes your brain's way of saying, 'I'm really tired. Can we just take a breather for second?' That breather will allow you to…moreWriter's block is oftentimes your brain's way of saying, 'I'm really tired. Can we just take a breather for second?' That breather will allow you to think through the kinks of your story before you dash off to the races again.(less)
Diriye Osman I get to do what I love most in the world. Sounds too much like cornball shizz? It's true though. I love writing and that's what compels me to keep…moreI get to do what I love most in the world. Sounds too much like cornball shizz? It's true though. I love writing and that's what compels me to keep going at it.(less)
Average rating: 4.29 · 170 ratings · 36 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Fairytales for Lost Children

4.27 avg rating — 162 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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We Once Belonged to the Sea

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings2 editions
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Black and Gay in the UK: An...

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4.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014
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Speak My Language, and Othe...

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4.19 avg rating — 31 ratings — published 2015 — 4 editions
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Jungle Jim #20

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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More books by Diriye Osman…
Dear reader,

Five years ago I sat down to write my first short story. It was a 2500 word narrative loosely modelled on my own life. Although I had previously written two unpublished, structurally messy novels, this one piece of short fiction altered my life in ways I couldn’t have imagined. This particular story was about a Somali teenager who had immigrated to the UK and although discouraged by... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on August 05, 2013 05:45 • 153 views • Tags: author-s-note, coming-of-age-stories, diriye-osman, fairytales-for-lost-children, immigration, lgbt, sexual-identity

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Diriye Osman shared a quote
Fairytales for Lost Children by Diriye Osman
“He carries home in the way he walks: an elegant, loose strut. He wears home on his skin in the form of attar, a delicious perfume that makes me dream of Somali coastlines, places where children play football amidst colonial ruins, and young men like Korfa flee in darkness on boats to Yemen and Kenya, determined never to look back.”
Diriye Osman
Diriye Osman shared a quote
Fairytales for Lost Children by Diriye Osman
“Even Story Time was political. Miss Mumbi infused each fairytale with Kenyan flavour. She illustrated these remixes on the blackboard. 'Rapunzel' became 'Rehema,' a fly gabar imprisoned in Fort Jesus. Rehema had an Afro that grew and grew. Her Afro grew bigger than her body and she looked bomb. The Afro became so strong that it burst through the ceiling of the fort. It exploded into the sky and reached the stars. The Afro wrapped itself around the moon and pulled Rehema out of the fort.”
Diriye Osman
Diriye Osman shared a quote
Fairytales for Lost Children by Diriye Osman
“Every experience lately felt like an experiment of the body, of its power and limitations. Such experiments created a desire for something more fulfilling. It was a hunger born of rootlessness but he couldn't see that. He couldn't see that true liberation was a strictly DIY process.”
Diriye Osman
Diriye Osman rated a book it was amazing
Fun Home by Alison Bechdel
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Diriye Osman rated a book it was amazing
Blonde Roots by Bernardine Evaristo
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A stunning, stunning novel. Beautifully written with a sense of precision and stylistic flair. I love this book.
Diriye Osman rated a book it was amazing
Breath, Eyes, Memory by Edwidge Danticat
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Runaway by Alice Munro
"Every story is a mini novel. You come to wonder how she does it. "
More of Diriye's books…
“The God of Imagination lived in fairytales. And the best fairytales made you fall in love. It was while flicking through "Sleeping Beauty" that I met my first love, Ivar. He was a six-year-old bello ragazzo with blond hair and eyebrows. He had bomb-blue eyes and his two front teeth were missing.
The road to Happily Ever After, however, was paved with political barbed wire. Three things stood in my way.
1. The object of my affection didn't know he was the object of my affection.
2. The object of my affection preferred Action Man to Princess Aurora.
3. The object of my affection was a boy and I wasn't allowed to love a boy.”
Diriye Osman, Fairytales for Lost Children

“Daughter, I want you to form the most intense, loving relationship with yourself. Only then will you realize your capacity for kindness and emotional expansiveness. Daughter, after you have formed this relationship with yourself, I want you to love others with the openness and humility that you always embodied as a child. Daughter, I want you to forgive easily, laugh loudly and never allow yourself to become the invisible, silent woman that your mother was. Daughter, this is how we soften our hearts and become better human beings.”
Diriye Osman

“Manic depression — or bipolar disorder — is like racing up to a clifftop before diving headfirst into a cavity. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is the psychic equivalent of an extreme sport. The manic highs — that exhilarating rush to the top of the cliff — make you feel bionic in your hyper-energized capacity for generosity, sexiness and soulfulness. You feel like you have ingested stars and are now glowing from within. It’s unearned confidence-in-extremis — with an emphasis on the con, because you feel cheated once you inevitably crash into that cavity. I sometimes joke that mania is the worst kind of pyramid scheme, one that the bipolar individual doesn’t even know they’re building, only to find out, too late, that they’re also its biggest casualty.”
Diriye Osman

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“The only seed that needs regular watering is our imagination.”
Diriye Osman, Fairytales for Lost Children

“The God of Imagination lived in fairytales. And the best fairytales made you fall in love. It was while flicking through "Sleeping Beauty" that I met my first love, Ivar. He was a six-year-old bello ragazzo with blond hair and eyebrows. He had bomb-blue eyes and his two front teeth were missing.
The road to Happily Ever After, however, was paved with political barbed wire. Three things stood in my way.
1. The object of my affection didn't know he was the object of my affection.
2. The object of my affection preferred Action Man to Princess Aurora.
3. The object of my affection was a boy and I wasn't allowed to love a boy.”
Diriye Osman, Fairytales for Lost Children

“I've always loved being gay. Sure, Kenya was not exactly Queer Nation but my sexuality gave me joy. I was young, not so dumb and full of cum! There was no place for me in heaven but I was content munching devil's pie here on earth.”
Diriye Osman, Fairytales for Lost Children

“In those sticky summer nights in South London our windows stay open and our tiny apartment becomes our secret garden. The magic of the secret garden is that it exists in our imagination. There are no limits, no borderlines. The secret garden leads to the marigolds of Mogadishu and the magnolias of Kingston and when the heat turns us sticky and sweet and unwilling to be claimed by defeat we own the night. We own our bodies. We own our lives.”
Diriye Osman, Fairytales for Lost Children

“i have been told many times by family, friends, colleagues and strangers that I, a black African Muslim lesbian, am not included in this vision; that my dreams are a reflection of my upbringing in a decadent, amoral Western society that has corrupted who I really am. But who am I, really? Am I allowed to speak for myself or must my desires form the battleground for causes I do not care about? My answer to that is simple: ‘no one allows anyone anything.’ By rejecting that notion you discover that only you can give yourself permission on how to lead your life, naysayers be damned. In the end something gives way. The earth doesn’t move but something shifts. That shift is change and change is the layman’s lingo for that elusive state that lovers, dreamers, prophets and politicians call ‘freedom’.”
Diriye Osman, Fairytales for Lost Children




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