Eliot Asinof



Average rating: 4.01 · 8,711 ratings · 268 reviews · 16 distinct worksSimilar authors
Eight Men Out: The Black So...

by
4.02 avg rating — 8,440 ratings — published 1963 — 14 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Man on Spikes

by
3.80 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 1998 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Craig and Joan: 2

3.43 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 1971 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Fox Is Crazy, Too: The ...

3.84 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 1976 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
1919: America's Loss of Inn...

3.44 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1990 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The 10-Second Jailbreak: Th...

3.58 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1973
Rate this book
Clear rating
Final Judgment

3.50 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2008
Rate this book
Clear rating
Off-Season

2.88 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2000
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Bedfellow

3.60 avg rating — 5 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Name Of The Game Is Mur...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Eliot Asinof…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“It was apparent that there were no facts. Reality was a vague stink that anyone could smell, but no one knew where it came from.”
Eliot Asinof

“To Cicotte, who had known Burns over the years, his performance was baffling. He had never sensed that the drawling Texan was capable of anything like this. Burns could make a dozen mistakes, find himself in a manure pile of troubles, yet now he came up clean. Cicotte need slip only once, and they'd be cutting him up in pieces.

On the mound, Cicotte was king. Year after year, they hadn't come any better. Burns had been a sloppy, very mediocre, third-rate nothing. Was the difference all in the skill of the pitching arm? What changed the pattern when it came to really staying alive?

The answer to that was the answer to the whole story of Cicotte's life. He had grown up believing it was talent that made a man big. If you were good enough, and dedicated yourself, you could get to the top. Wasn't that enough of a reward? But when he got there, he had found otherwise. They all fed off him, the men who ran the show and pulled the strings that kept it working. They used him and used him and when they had used him up, they would dump him. In the few years he had been up, they had always praised him and made him feel like a hero to the people of America. But all the time they paid him peanuts. The newspapermen who came to watch him pitch and wrote stories about him made more money than he did. Meanwhile, Comiskey made a half million dollars a year on Cicotte's right arm.

Burns knew how to operate. So did Gandil. Cicotte didn't. That was the answer.”
Eliot Asinof, Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series

“To Replogle, the players were victims. The owners poured out a stream of pious, pompous verbiage about how pure they were. The gamblers said nothing, kept themselves hidden, protected themselves —and when they said anything, it was strictly for cash, with immunity, no less. But the ballplayers didn’t even know enough to call a lawyer. They only knew how to play baseball.”
Eliot Asinof, Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Eliot to Goodreads.