N. Katherine Hayles



Average rating: 3.93 · 1,609 ratings · 120 reviews · 21 distinct worksSimilar authors
How We Became Posthuman: Vi...

4.03 avg rating — 758 ratings — published 1999 — 8 editions
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Writing Machines

3.83 avg rating — 197 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
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Electronic Literature: New ...

3.74 avg rating — 117 ratings — published 2008 — 2 editions
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How We Think: Digital Media...

3.76 avg rating — 128 ratings — published 2012 — 6 editions
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My Mother Was a Computer: D...

3.77 avg rating — 109 ratings — published 2005 — 7 editions
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Unthought: The Power of the...

4.02 avg rating — 41 ratings3 editions
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Chaos and Order: Complex Dy...

3.72 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 1991 — 4 editions
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Chaos Bound: Orderly Disord...

3.96 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 1990 — 4 editions
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Comparative Textual Media: ...

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4.06 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 2013 — 5 editions
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The Cosmic Web: Scientific ...

4.05 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 1985 — 3 editions
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More books by N. Katherine Hayles…
“If my nightmare is a culture inhabited by posthumans who regard their bodies as fashion accessories rather than the ground of being, my dream is a version of the posthuman that embraces the possibilities of information technologies without being seduced by fantasies of unlimited power and disembodied immortality, that recognizes and celebrates finitude as a condition of human being, and that understands human life is embedded in a material world of great complexity, one on which we depend for our continued survival.”
N. Katherine Hayles, How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics

“Virtuality is the cultural perception that material objects are interpenetrated by information patterns. The definition plays off the duality at the heart of the condition of virtuality—materiality on the one hand, information on the other. Normally virtuality is associated with computer simulations that put the body into a feedback loop with a computer-generated image. For example, in virtual Ping-Pong, one swings a paddle wired into a computer, which calculates from the paddle’s momentum and position where the ball would go. Instead of hitting a real ball, the player makes the appropriate motions with the paddle and watches the image of the ball on a computer monitor. Thus the game takes place partly in real life (RL) and partly in virtual reality (VR). Virtual reality technologies are fascinating because they make visually immediate the perception that a world of information exists parallel to the “real” world, the former intersecting the latter at many points and in many ways. Hence the definition’s strategic quality, strategic because it seeks to connect virtual technologies with the sense, pervasive in the late twentieth century, that all material objects are interpenetrated by flows of information, from DNA code to the global reach of the World Wide Web.”
N. Katherine Hayles, How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics

“literary studies share with Moravec a major blind spot when it comes to the significance of embodiment.3 This blind spot is most evident, perhaps, when literary and cultural critics confront the fields of evolutionary biology. From an evolutionary biologist’s point of view, modern humans, for all their technological prowess, represent an eye blink in the history of life, a species far too recent to have significant evolutionary impact on human biological behaviors and structures. In my view, arguments like those that Jared Diamond advances in Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies and Why Sex Is Fun : The Evolution of Human Sexuality should be taken seriously.4 The body is the net result of thousands of years of sedimented evolutionary history, and it is naive to think that this history does not affect human behaviors at every level of thought and action.”
N. Katherine Hayles, How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics

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