Brigid Schulte

Donald M.
90 books | 516 friends

David R...
639 books | 92 friends

Patrick...
19 books | 399 friends

Ernie H...
335 books | 2,475 friends

Les Aaron
1 book | 703 friends

Jen Tur...
678 books | 802 friends

Karen D...
46 books | 101 friends

Catie M...
1,097 books | 26 friends

More friends…

Brigid Schulte

Goodreads Author


Born
in Eugene, OR, The United States
Website

Twitter

Genre

Member Since
September 2008


Brigid Schulte is an award-winning journalist for the Washington Post and Washington Post magazine. She was part of a team that won the Pulitzer Prize. She is also a fellow at the New America Foundation. She lives in Alexandria, Virginia with her husband and two children. She grew up in Oregon and spent summers in Wyoming, where she did not feel overwhelmed.

To ask Brigid Schulte questions, please sign up.

Popular Answered Questions

Brigid Schulte Hi Jody!

Thanks so much for the kind words! I'm so glad you liked Overwhelmed. (and good for you for letting go of the guilt - perhaps you can't carve…more
Hi Jody!

Thanks so much for the kind words! I'm so glad you liked Overwhelmed. (and good for you for letting go of the guilt - perhaps you can't carve out time every day for your work, but if you looked over the course of a week, or a month and saw how much time you were able to find, you might find more ease.)

And thanks for your question. It's a good one.

When it comes to productivity, we're all wired a little differently. Some of us are night owls, some like to get up at the crack of dawn. Those are two very distinct "chronotypes" - most of us can fall somewhere in the middle, or even switch through our lifetimes.

That said, Steve Kay, a professor of molecular & computational biology at the USC who studies our natural body clock, told Sue Shellenbarger of the Wall Street Journal that being in tune with our natural cycles can give us "an edge in daily life."

-For cognitive work, most adults perform best in the late morning. Working memory, alertness and concentration gradually improve, Shellenbarger wrote, as body temperature starts to rise just before we wake up and climbs through mid-day.

-Take breaks! The Federal Aviation Administration has found that short breaks between longer working sessions resulted in a 16 percent boost in awareness and focus. Anders Ericcson, who studied excellence, found that the best musicians were more productive during their practice sessions, and took more breaks and got more sleep than other musicians.

My colleague at the Washington Post, Jena McGregor, wrote a fascinating piece on DeskTime, a software program that tracks work productivity. They found that the most productive workers do focused work for about 57 minutes, then take a break and completely step away from their computers for 17.

Here's a link: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/o...

Jenna has another interesting piece on the best (and worst) times to do things at work:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/o...

-Research shows we start to slide just after lunch. We're most easily distracted from noon to 4.

-Sleepiness tends to peak around 2 pm, according to Robert Matchock, an associate professor of psychology at Penn State.

-But here's the interesting thing - fatigue seems to boost creative powers (perhaps because that pesky and loud internal critic in our heads is too tired to pay much attention?) Another study found that adults tackle open-ended problems best when they're tired in the evening.

(In truth - when I was writing, I found I had to be well rested and fresh. But when I was editing? The more tired I was, the better - or at least the more ruthlessly - I was able to edit! I had no patience!)

-Exercise is best done between 3 and 6 pm with the least risk of injury, when muscle strength and eye-hand coordination are at their peak, according to Michael Smolensky, a biomedical engineering professor at Univ. of Texas at Austin. (sorry, I have to do it first thing, or I'll spend the entire day in my workout gear, with my butt in my chair working and never break a sweat.)

-Eating is best done during the active hours of the day. In an experiment, the mice who ate only while active were 40 percent leaner than a control group on the same diet that ate anytime they felt like it. (Hmm, no more late night procrasti eating on deadline...)

-Research has found that when we send emails early in the day - at say 6 am, they're more likely to be read. That's according to Dan Zarrella, a social media scientist for HubPot, a web marketing firm.

-Reading twitter at 8 or 9 am can start the day on a bright and fun note. But if you want your post to be retweeted - you'll have more luck between 3 and 6 when people are tired and may not have the energy to post something noteworthy of their own. And the drama and emotion can light up between 10 and 11 pm.

Likewise, Facebook tends to get the most "likes" after about 8 pm.

Here's a link to Sue's fascinating story in the WSJ:
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/S...

Now, go and listen to your body and enjoy the day!

Thanks for the question

Best,
Brigid



(less)
Average rating: 3.86 · 5,734 ratings · 748 reviews · 3 distinct worksSimilar authors
Overwhelmed: Work, Love, an...

3.86 avg rating — 5,733 ratings — published 2014 — 20 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Sobrecarregados - Trabalho,...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Balancing the Big Stuff: Fi...

by
4.15 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating

* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

I began this book quite by accident. As I describe in chapter 1, I was appointed to an internal working group at the Washington Post when an analysis of our readers found a big gap between male and female readers, particularly between the ages of 18 – 44 – what our demographic researchers call “the frenetic family” demographic. Our committee – comprised of all women journalists – took one look... Read more of this blog post »
1 like ·   •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on February 07, 2014 23:45 • 239 views

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

Goodhouse
Brigid Schulte is currently reading
by Peyton Marshall (Goodreads Author)
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
Matterness
Brigid Schulte is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
Radiance of Tomorrow
Brigid Schulte is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 

Brigid’s Recent Updates

Brigid Schulte is now friends with Jasmine
987667
Brigid Schulte joined the group MOTHERS Book Bag
20688
Brigid Schulte has read
Moody Bitches by Julie Holland
Rate this book
Clear rating
Holland has some fascinating - and disturbing research - about what medicating away our moods and emotions is doing to us. And she makes a powerful argument for embracing ourselves in all our natural and glorious imperfection. Which is a great messag ...more
Brigid Schulte is currently reading
Moody Bitches by Julie Holland
Rate this book
Clear rating
Brigid Schulte is currently reading
Goodhouse by Peyton Marshall
Goodhouse
by Peyton Marshall (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Brigid Schulte has read
Casebook by Mona Simpson
Casebook
by Mona Simpson (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Secrets, love and what lifts us up, tears us apart and heals us as people, friends and family, all through the eyes of an overly curious overweight teenage boy and his friend. Listening devices, pets, Albert Einstein and math.
Brigid Schulte has read
Pilgrims and Other Stories by Elizabeth Gilbert
Rate this book
Clear rating
Brigid Schulte has read
Committed by Elizabeth Gilbert
Rate this book
Clear rating
Interesting meditation on marriage - its history and its perplexing evolution in the modern age
Brigid Schulte wants to read
The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert
Rate this book
Clear rating
Brigid Schulte has read
The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. Le Guin
Rate this book
Clear rating
When I was growing up in Portland, Oregon, Ursula LeGuin was my hero. I read the EarthSea Trilogy (that's what it was back them) - and slipped into another universe for hours on end. Then, as I got older, I thought I had to "grow up" and read "real" ...more
More of Brigid's books…
“Busyness is now the social norm that people feel they must conform to, Burnett says, or risk being outcasts.”
Brigid Schulte, Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time

“What if not just women, but both men and women, worked smart, more flexible schedules? What if the workplace itself was more fluid than the rigid and narrow ladder to success of the ideal worker? And what if both men and women became responsible for raising children and managing the home, sharing work, love, and play? Could everyone then live whole lives?”
Brigid Schulte, Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time

“What often matters more than the activity we're doing at a moment in time is how we feel about it.”
Brigid Schulte, Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time

Topics Mentioning This Author

“I wish I were a girl again, half-savage and hardy, and free.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

“Trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit.”
Molière

“What if not just women, but both men and women, worked smart, more flexible schedules? What if the workplace itself was more fluid than the rigid and narrow ladder to success of the ideal worker? And what if both men and women became responsible for raising children and managing the home, sharing work, love, and play? Could everyone then live whole lives?”
Brigid Schulte, Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time

“They say a person needs just three things to be truly happy in this world: someone to love, something to do, and something to hope for.”
Tom Bodett

“I’ve named everything that I’ve ever owned. Real or inanimate, I have to give it a first and last name. Everything in my apartment comes alive at night.”
Amy Sedaris

35642 Women and Books — 241 members — last activity Jul 23, 2018 01:09PM
A group for adult women to chat -- mainly about fiction but also including non-fiction, periodicals, cookbooks, media or whatever else is on your mind ...more
20688 MOTHERS Book Bag — 41 members — last activity Aug 20, 2016 11:17AM
Join our virtual book club for those concerned with issues of equity in employment and economic security for caregivers, especially mothers.



No comments have been added yet.