Agatha Christie Mallowan

Agatha Christie Mallowan


Born
in Torquay, Devon, The United Kingdom
September 15, 1890

Died
January 12, 1976

Genre


Agatha Christie used the name Mallowan to publish Come, Tell Me How You Live, a memoir about life on architectural digs with her second husband Max Mallowan; and Star over Bethlehem, a collection of stories & poems.

Average rating: 4.13 · 2,454 ratings · 254 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
Come, Tell Me How You Live

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4.14 avg rating — 2,358 ratings — published 1946 — 49 editions
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Star Over Bethlehem and Oth...

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3.71 avg rating — 346 ratings — published 1965 — 23 editions
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“My sister says tearfully that she has a feeling that she will never see me again. I am not very much impressed, because she has felt this every time I go to the East. And what, she asks, is she to do if Rosalind gets appendicitis? There seems no reason why my fourteen-year-old daughter should get appendicitis, and all I can think of to reply is: ‘Don’t operate on her yourself!’ For my sister has a great reputation for hasty action with her scissors,”
Agatha Christie Mallowan, Come, Tell Me How You Live: An Archaeological Memoir

“I pass to the Stationery Department. I buy several fountain and stylographic pens - it being my experience that, though a fountain pen in England behaves in an exemplary manner, the moment it is let loose in desert surroundings, it perceives that it is at liberty to go on strike and behaves accordingly, either spouting ink indiscriminately over me, my clothes, my notebook and anything else handy, or else coyly refusing to do anything but scratch invisibly across the surface of the paper. I also buy a modest two pencils. Pencils are, fortunately, not temperamental, and though given to a knack of quiet disappearance, I have always a resource at hand. After all, what is the use of an architect if not to borrow pencils from.”
Agatha Christie Mallowan, Come, Tell Me How You Live

“After this interlude we return to the question of the parcel. Yes, says the Postmaster, it has been here – actually here in the office! But it is here no longer. It has been removed to the custody of the Customs. Monsieur B. must realize that parcels are subject to Customs dues. B. says that it is personal wearing apparel. The Postmaster says: ‘No doubt, no doubt; but that is the affair of the Customs.’ ‘We must, then, go to the Customs office?’ ‘That will be the proper procedure,’ agrees the Postmaster. ‘Not that it will be any use going today. Today is Wednesday, and on Wednesdays the Customs are closed.’ ‘Tomorrow, then?’ ‘Yes, tomorrow the Customs will be open.’ ‘Sorry,’ says B. to Max. ‘I suppose it means I shall have to come in again tomorrow to get my parcel.’ The Postmaster says that certainly Monsieur B. will have to come in tomorrow, but that even tomorrow he will not be able to get his parcel. ‘Why not?’ demands B. ‘Because, after the formalities of the Customs have been settled, the parcel must then go through the Post Office.’ ‘You mean, I shall have to come on here?’ ‘Precisely. And that will not be possible tomorrow, for tomorrow the Post Office will be closed,’ says the Postmaster triumphantly. We go into the subject in detail, but officialdom triumphs at every turn. On no day of the week, apparently, are both the Customs and the Post Office open!”
Agatha Christie Mallowan, Come, Tell Me How You Live: An Archaeological Memoir

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