Joel Brinkley


Born
in Washington, D.C., The United States
July 22, 1952

Died
March 11, 2014


A Pulitzer Prize winning reporter at the New York Times for many years.

Average rating: 3.84 · 1,004 ratings · 107 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Cambodia's Curse: The Moder...

3.84 avg rating — 970 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
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Defining Vision: How Broadc...

4.29 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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U.S. V. Microsoft: The Insi...

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3.30 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2000 — 4 editions
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The Circus Master's Mission

3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1989 — 3 editions
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Writing Choices: Shaping Co...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2000
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More books by Joel Brinkley…
“Be careful because Cambodia is the most dangerous place you will ever visit. You will fall in love with it, and eventually it will break your heart.”
Joel Brinkley, Cambodia's Curse: The Modern History of a Troubled Land

“The United States Congress ordered an end to the bombing of Cambodia in August 1973. By that time American aircraft had dropped about 2.75 million tons of ordnance, causing massive carnage that has never been fully documented or accounted for. Yet Congress’s ban was enacted not out of concern for the Cambodian victims. As Representative Tip O’Neill said during the floor debate, “Cambodia is not worth the life of one American flier.” The”
Joel Brinkley, Cambodia's Curse: The Modern History of a Troubled Land

“While trying to understand Cambodia, foreign writers sometimes fall into glib stereotypes and generalizations. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, French writers routinely characterized the people as “obedient and lazy.” These people liked to note that Cambodians would plant just enough rice to feed their families and then go home. If fertilizer or a hybrid rice seed allowed them to double the size of their crop, they would grow only half as much. Philip Short, the British author, made the same point, concluding that “the perception of indolence has become part of the country’s self image, an explanation for its failure to keep up with its neighbors.” Michael”
Joel Brinkley, Cambodia's Curse: The Modern History of a Troubled Land

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