Yoko Hasegawa

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Member Since
April 2014


Average rating: 4.23 · 114 ratings · 19 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Routledge Course in Jap...

4.36 avg rating — 36 ratings — published 2011 — 9 editions
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Elementary Japanese Volume ...

4.14 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 2005
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Japanese: A Linguistic Intr...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Elementary Japanese Volume ...

4.36 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2006
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Elementary Japanese Volume ...

4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2015
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Elementary Japanese Teacher...

4.14 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2006
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Elementary Japanese Volume ...

4.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2015
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Soliloquy in Japanese and E...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2010 — 3 editions
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The Cambridge Handbook of J...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings5 editions
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lightworkeryosanassentionsu...

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More books by Yoko Hasegawa…

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Yoko Hasegawa wants to read
The Japanese Language Through Time by Samuel E. Martin
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More of Yoko's books…
“5.6.2. Egocentricity

"The linguistic phenomenon of evidentiality reflects a strong awareness of the self in Japanese language usage, however primordial and simplistic such a notion may be. In order to use the language appropriately, the speaker needs to be aware of the distinction between self and all others. This fact runs counter to many researchers in anthropology, linguistics, and sociology who contend that the Japanese people lack the concept of the individualistic self akin to the Western notion of self. Some even insist that Japan is a "selfless" society. Actual observation of Japanese society clearly demonstrates these notions to be myths.

Quite the contrary, Japanese is a highly egocentric language, in which the presence of "I" as the speaker is so obvious as to not have to be expressed overtly.”
Yoko Hasegawa, The Routledge Course in Japanese Translation




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