Chris McMullen

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Chris McMullen

Goodreads Author


Born
Los Angeles, The United States
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Member Since
March 2013


Dr. Chris McMullen has over 20 years of experience teaching university physics in California, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Louisiana. Dr. McMullen is also an author of math and science books. Whether in the classroom or as a writer, Dr. McMullen loves sharing knowledge and the art of motivating and engaging students.

Chris McMullen earned his Ph.D. in phenomenological high-energy physics (particle physics) from Oklahoma State University in 2002. Originally from California, Dr. McMullen earned his Master's degree from California State University, Northridge, where his thesis was in the field of electron spin resonance.

Dr. McMullen is well-known for:
• engaging students in challenging ideas through creativity
• breaking difficult problems down in
...more

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Popular Answered Questions

Chris McMullen Yes. Volume 2 of my detailed guide to self-publishing is predominantly about marketing. One large chapter is strictly devoted to marketing, while most…moreYes. Volume 2 of my detailed guide to self-publishing is predominantly about marketing. One large chapter is strictly devoted to marketing, while most of the others also relate to marketing. The ISBN for volume 2 is 1484037243, and you can find its Goodreads page here:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1...

Thank you for reading my blog and taking the time to comment and ask your question here at Goodreads.

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Chris(less)
Chris McMullen That's a really good and challenging question. It's sometimes possible to present the same idea in multiple forms, visual (with a picture), audio (spe…moreThat's a really good and challenging question. It's sometimes possible to present the same idea in multiple forms, visual (with a picture), audio (speak while writing), written, doing (hands-on), etc. There is never time to do everything every way, so we have to pick and choose what is important. A huge part of teaching is clear communication. I strive to use words and phrasing that will be clear to all students when possible; I feel like big and abstract ideas can be expressed in terms that everyone can understand without losing technical detail; it's a challenge, but a good goal. When I interact with students, occasionally I learn that a student interpreted a word or phrase in a way that I had never anticipated, and I try to learn from it; experience helps me avoid this, but language is so complex, the best we can hope to do is minimize it. However, there still needs to be balance; if the students are only used to the extra effort that I make to make things clear, they won't be prepared for what they are likely to encounter beyond the class. For that, they need to be confronted with communication they are likely to encounter elsewhere, and hopefully discussions about this and feedback will help them learn to cope with it. It's a very complicated problem (making the material clear for everyone and preparing them for beyond the curriculum), but we can strive to help. As for students who have documented disabilities, when I was teaching at both the university and a math/sci high school, there were people at the school trained to help provide accommodations (particularly for testing conditions), and they were helpful to me also when needed. Good luck.(less)
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More books by Chris McMullen…

Advertising in Canada and Australia (login problems?) AMS via KDP

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Amazon has made advertising in Canada (print or ebook) and Australia (ebook only) available at AMS via KDP. (Regions previously available include the USA, UK, and continental Europe).


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Don’t go to Reports > Ad Campaigns > Learn more > C

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Published on August 25, 2020 07:28

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Logarithms and Exponentials Essential Skills Practice Workboo... by Chris McMullen
"Clear, concise, and comprehensive. This workbook includes plenty of practice problems, with answers, as well as some explanation and review at the start of each chapter. This would be good for independent practice or for a teacher looking for practic" Read more of this review »
" Ah! That makes sense. Thank you very much. :-) "
Chris McMullen answered Regina Tula's question: Chris McMullen
That's a really good and challenging question. It's sometimes possible to present the same idea in multiple forms, visual (with a picture), audio (speak while writing), written, doing (hands-on), etc. There is never time to do everything every way, s See Full Answer
What's That Word? Vocabulary Quizzes by Douglas Grey
"Throughout your life, especially those years when you went to public school, you’ve been tested continuously on everything that you’ve learned. You had been given questions and you had to respond with the correct answers. Game quiz shows also gave qu" Read more of this review »
50 Challenging Algebra Problems by Chris McMullen
"Good review

If you need a refresher on the basics of algebra (prep for SAT, GRE, etc) not a bad place to start. Straightforward examples and how to solve without getting into the weeds."
50 Challenging Algebra Problems by Chris McMullen
"This is a great book for either developing good conceptual understanding and technical problem-solving skills or maintaining them. The problems are a good selection of both straightforward equations/inequalities/systems of equations, or word problems" Read more of this review »
" That's a good question.

Read a couple of paragraphs further to find a note specifically for authors and publishers:

"Book authors and publishers may con
...more "
Chris McMullen rated a book it was amazing
The Mercenary Prince by Charles E. Yallowitz
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Chris McMullen rated a book it was amazing
There's No Such Thing As Monsters by Michael    Yu
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More of Chris's books…
“The angular momentum of a planet in its orbit around the sun is L = mvr where L is the angular momentum, m is the mass of planet, v is the instantaneous speed of planet, and r is the instantaneous distance from the sun to the planet.”
Chris McMullen, An Introduction to Basic Astronomy Concepts

“A star that appears blue is hotter, while a star that appears red is cooler. This is because the temperature of the star is related to its wavelength through Wien’s law, which says that temperature times wavelength is a constant. Higher temperature means shorter wavelength and lower temperature means longer wavelength. Red light has a longer wavelength than blue light, so blue stars are hotter and red stars are cooler.”
Chris McMullen, An Introduction to Basic Astronomy Concepts

“2 e- --> Cu, the Cu2”
Chris McMullen, Understand Basic Chemistry Concepts: The Periodic Table, Chemical Bonds, Naming Compounds, Balancing Equations, and More

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