István Aranyosi

Goodreads Author


Born
in Sighet/Máramarossziget, Romania
Website

Twitter

Genre

Member Since
August 2012


István Aranyosi was born in Sighet/Máramarossziget, in the north of Transylvania, in 1975. He studied philosophy in Budapest, at the Central European University, where he obtained his PhD in 2005. In 2006-2007 he was a fellow at the Centre for Consciousness, The Australian National University. He is currently Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bilkent University, Ankara. In 2012 he obtained Honorable Mention for his essay "A new argument for mind-brain identity" at the American Philosophical Association's prestigious Article Prize. He published widely in the fields of philosophy of mind and metaphysics, including two books: The Peripheral Mind (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2013) and God, Mind, and Logical Space (Palgrave Macmillan ...more

You can check out the introductory chapter of The Peripheral Mind (OUP 2013), by following this link:

http://philpapers.org/rec/ARAMOM

Let me know what you think!
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on February 22, 2013 09:24 • 151 views • Tags: bodily-experience, embodied-mind, nerve-damage, phenomenology, philosophy-of-mind
Average rating: 4.33 · 3 ratings · 0 reviews · 2 distinct works
The Peripheral Mind: Philos...

4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
God, Mind and Logical Space...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating

* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

The Hand, an Orga...
Rate this book
Clear rating

 

István’s Recent Updates

István is now friends with Alex Robciuc
62313295
István wants to read
Denial of Violence by Fatma Müge Göçek
Rate this book
Clear rating
István finished reading
New Perspectives on Type Identity by Simone Gozzano
Rate this book
Clear rating
István rated a book it was amazing
Making Sense of Heritability by Neven Sesardic
Rate this book
Clear rating
István rated a book it was amazing
Worlds and Individuals, Possible and Otherwise by Takashi Yagisawa
Rate this book
Clear rating
István rated a book really liked it
The Hand, an Organ of the Mind by Zdravko Radman
Rate this book
Clear rating
István rated a book really liked it
New Perspectives on Type Identity by Simone Gozzano
Rate this book
Clear rating
István liked a quote
God, Mind and Logical Space by István Aranyosi
“In his movie The Seventh Continent, Michael Haneke depicts a normal middle-class family who, for no apparent reason, one day quit their jobs, destroy everything in their apartment, including all the cash they have just withdrawn from the bank, and commit suicide. The story, according to Haneke, was inspired by a true story of an Austrian middle-class family who committed collective suicide. As Haneke points out in a subsequent interview, the cliché questions that people are tempted to ask when confronted with such a situation are: “did they have some trouble in their marriage?”, or “were they dissatisfied with their jobs?”. Haneke’s point, however, is to discredit such questions; if he wanted to create a Hollywood-style drama, he would have offered clues indicating some such problems that we superficially seek when trying to explain people’s choices. But his point was precisely that the most profound thoughts about whether life is meaningful occur once we have swept aside all the clic ...more István Aranyosi
István is currently reading
New Perspectives on Type Identity by Simone Gozzano
Rate this book
Clear rating
István rated a book it was amazing
Time and the Other by Johannes Fabian
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of István's books…
“Self-consciousness is, from a naturalistic point of view (in this case neurobiological), not more than a degree of sophistication of neural processes. The emergence of self-conscious states is not a drastic, extravagant, earth-shaking phenomenon.”
István Aranyosi, The Peripheral Mind: Philosophy of Mind and the Peripheral Nervous System

“In truth, there is no such thing as an “intuitive boundary” of a sensory state. That most philosophers take such states as brain-bound is not an intuition, but a prejudice.”
István Aranyosi, The Peripheral Mind: Philosophy of Mind and the Peripheral Nervous System

“In his movie The Seventh Continent, Michael Haneke depicts a normal middle-class family who, for no apparent reason, one day quit their jobs, destroy everything in their apartment, including all the cash they have just withdrawn from the bank, and commit suicide. The story, according to Haneke, was inspired by a true story of an Austrian middle-class family who committed collective suicide. As Haneke points out in a subsequent interview, the cliché questions that people are tempted to ask when confronted with such a situation are: “did they have some trouble in their marriage?”, or “were they dissatisfied with their jobs?”. Haneke’s point, however, is to discredit such questions; if he wanted to create a Hollywood-style drama, he would have offered clues indicating some such problems that we superficially seek when trying to explain people’s choices. But his point was precisely that the most profound thoughts about whether life is meaningful occur once we have swept aside all the clichés about the pleasure or lack thereof of “love, work, and play” (Thagard), or of “being whooshed up in sports events and being absorbed in the coffee-making craft” (Dreyfus and Kelly). Psychologically, or psychotherapeutically, these are very useful ways of “finding meaning in one’s life”, but philosophically, they are rather ways of how to avoid raising the question, how to insulate oneself from the likelihood that the question of meaning will be raised to oneself.

In my view, then, the particular answer to the second question (what is the meaning of life?) is not that important, because whatever answer one offers, even the nihilist or absurdist answer, is many times good enough if the purpose is to get rid of the state of puzzlement. More importantly, however, what matters is that the question itself was raised, and the question is posterior to the more fundamental one of whether there is any meaning at all in life. It is also intuitive that we could judge someone’s life as meaningless if that person has never wondered whether her life, and life in general, is meaningful or not. At the same time, our proposal is, in my opinion, neither elitist, nor parochial in any way; I find it empirically quite plausible that the vast majority of people have actually asked this question or some version of it at least once during their lives, regardless of their social class, wealth, religion, ethnicity, gender, cultural background, or historical period.”
István Aranyosi, God, Mind and Logical Space: A Revisionary Approach to Divinity

“In his movie The Seventh Continent, Michael Haneke depicts a normal middle-class family who, for no apparent reason, one day quit their jobs, destroy everything in their apartment, including all the cash they have just withdrawn from the bank, and commit suicide. The story, according to Haneke, was inspired by a true story of an Austrian middle-class family who committed collective suicide. As Haneke points out in a subsequent interview, the cliché questions that people are tempted to ask when confronted with such a situation are: “did they have some trouble in their marriage?”, or “were they dissatisfied with their jobs?”. Haneke’s point, however, is to discredit such questions; if he wanted to create a Hollywood-style drama, he would have offered clues indicating some such problems that we superficially seek when trying to explain people’s choices. But his point was precisely that the most profound thoughts about whether life is meaningful occur once we have swept aside all the clichés about the pleasure or lack thereof of “love, work, and play” (Thagard), or of “being whooshed up in sports events and being absorbed in the coffee-making craft” (Dreyfus and Kelly). Psychologically, or psychotherapeutically, these are very useful ways of “finding meaning in one’s life”, but philosophically, they are rather ways of how to avoid raising the question, how to insulate oneself from the likelihood that the question of meaning will be raised to oneself.

In my view, then, the particular answer to the second question (what is the meaning of life?) is not that important, because whatever answer one offers, even the nihilist or absurdist answer, is many times good enough if the purpose is to get rid of the state of puzzlement. More importantly, however, what matters is that the question itself was raised, and the question is posterior to the more fundamental one of whether there is any meaning at all in life. It is also intuitive that we could judge someone’s life as meaningless if that person has never wondered whether her life, and life in general, is meaningful or not. At the same time, our proposal is, in my opinion, neither elitist, nor parochial in any way; I find it empirically quite plausible that the vast majority of people have actually asked this question or some version of it at least once during their lives, regardless of their social class, wealth, religion, ethnicity, gender, cultural background, or historical period.”
István Aranyosi, God, Mind and Logical Space: A Revisionary Approach to Divinity




No comments have been added yet.