Susan  Sherman

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Susan Sherman

Goodreads Author


Born
Los Angeles, The United States
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Member Since
September 2010


Susan Sherman is a former Chairman of the Art Department of Whittier College, a small liberal arts university. She is also the co-creator of “That’s So Raven,”

Chosen for "Great New Reads in Fiction" by People Magazine, Susan Sherman's debut novel, The Little Russian, has garnered starred reviews in Booklist, Library Journal, and Publishers Weekly, and has captured the hearts of readers with its tribute to the too-often unsung heroines of history.

Her second book, IF YOU ARE THERE, set in the early 1900's is about a young Polish girl, Lucia Rutkowska, who escapes the textile mills in Warsaw and sets off for Paris to make something of herself. Through a series of bizarre events she finds work in a home run by two scientists consumed by their
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Average rating: 3.66 · 1,068 ratings · 153 reviews · 3 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Little Russian

3.68 avg rating — 966 ratings — published 2012 — 6 editions
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If You Are There

3.40 avg rating — 94 ratings5 editions
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Remembering Who We Are

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3.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1981
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* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

The Sofa

My grandmother had a sofa, which I’m pretty sure she thought was the most beautiful piece of furniture she had ever seen. The idea that she owned such a piece must have been a continual source of pride for her judging by how she kept it entombed in a thick plastic cover that was never removed, not once, not even on every third Thursday when the Hadassah ladies came for cards. It had a high rosewoo Read more of this blog post »
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Published on February 21, 2012 09:15
The Little Russian (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated Oct 27, 2011 11:51AM
Description: The Little Russian spotlights an exciting new voice in historical fiction, an assured debut that should appeal to readers of Away by Amy Bloom or Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier. The novel tells the story of Berta Alshonsky, who revels in childhood memories of her time spent with a wealthy family in Moscow –a life filled with salons, balls and all the trappings of the upper class — very different from her current life as a grocer’s daughter in the Jewish townlet of Mosny. So when a mysterious and cultured wheat merchant walks into the grocery, Berta’s life is forever altered. She falls in love, unaware that he is a member of the Bund, The Jewish Worker’s League, smuggling arms to the shtetls to defend them against the pogroms sweeping the Little Russian countryside. Married and established in the wheat center of Cherkast, Berta has recaptured the life she once had in Moscow. So when a smuggling operation goes awry and her husband must flee the country, Berta makes the vain and foolish choice to stay behind with her children and her finery. As Russia plunges into war, Berta eventually loses everything and must find a new way to sustain the lives and safety of her children. Filled with heart-stopping action, richly drawn characters, and a world seeped in war and violence; The Little Russian is poised to capture readers as a highly regarded gem of the season.
“Berta, like so many Great Russians, thought of Kiev and the surrounding provinces as a Russian outpost: provincial, backward, but Russified to some extent. She had a respect for both the Polish and German influences there, but agreed with the authorities that the Ukrainian culture and language had little to offer. It was banned in the schools and in the government institutions and was thought to be the purlieu of reprobates, lazy slum dwellers, and rustics. Berta was born in Little Russia, a small fact that she never bothered to share with anyone of consequence. She was a Great Russian, as anyone could see by her fierce accomplishments, tasteful dress, and overall refinement.”
Susan Sherman, The Little Russian

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“Owen," Henry said excitedly, "I think Coach wants you to hit for Meccini."

Owen closed The Voyage of the Beagle, on which he had recently embarked. "Really?"

"Runners on first and second," Rick said. "I bet he wants you to bunt."

"What's the bunt sign?"

"Two tugs on the left earlobe," Henry told him. "But first he has to give the indicator, which is squeeze the belt. But if he goes to his cap with either hand or says your first name, that's the wipe-off, and then you have to wait and see whether--"

"Forget it," Owen said. "I'll just bunt.”
Chad Harbach, The Art of Fielding

“Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
Oscar Wilde

“Berta, like so many Great Russians, thought of Kiev and the surrounding provinces as a Russian outpost: provincial, backward, but Russified to some extent. She had a respect for both the Polish and German influences there, but agreed with the authorities that the Ukrainian culture and language had little to offer. It was banned in the schools and in the government institutions and was thought to be the purlieu of reprobates, lazy slum dwellers, and rustics. Berta was born in Little Russia, a small fact that she never bothered to share with anyone of consequence. She was a Great Russian, as anyone could see by her fierce accomplishments, tasteful dress, and overall refinement.”
Susan Sherman, The Little Russian

93807 Q&A with author Susan Sherman — 12 members — last activity Feb 06, 2013 08:35AM
Join acclaimed author Susan Sherman for a discussion of her novel, The Little Russian . This group will run February 4-February 17. This is a p ...more
26989 Goodreads Authors/Readers — 42560 members — last activity 3 hours, 42 min ago
This group is dedicated to connecting readers with Goodreads authors. It is divided by genres, and includes folders for writing resources, book websit ...more



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