Clare O'Farrell

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Born
Australia
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Member Since
September 2008

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Average rating: 3.93 · 46 ratings · 3 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
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More books by Clare O'Farrell…
Sculpting in Time
Clare rated a book it was amazing
read in June, 2012
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Clare Clare said: " A truly wonderful book. For some extrapolations around some of the ideas in this book see my blog http://inputs.wordpress.com/2012/06/0... ...more "

 
invention du conf...
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“Instead of using education to train students to calmly accept their fate as specialised and highly regulated workers, mindlessly perpetuating an increasingly complex and hierarchically ordered economy, students should be invited at every possible opportunity to consider and imagine alternative scenarios, no matter how seemingly impractical. After all, yesterday's dream is today's reality. If the education system can be used to train, to prepare willing and competent workers, it can also be used to invite people to ask questions about what competence means and about why 'work' and material production are currently such high social priorities. In short, if education can be a machine for social conformity, it can also be a machine for the investigation of new horizons and new possibilities. The proliferation of 'difference' and uncertainy in the postmodern world, far from being a problem, is a constant invitation to imagine the unimaginable.”
Clare O'Farrell

“[Raymond Roussel] said that after his first book he expected that the next morning there would be a kind of aura around his person and that everyone in the street would be able to see that he had written a book. This is the obscure desire harboured by everyone who writes. It is true that the first text one writes is neither written for others, nor because one is what one is: one writes to become other than what one is. One tries to modify one's way of being through the act of writing.”
Michel Foucault




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