John Lister-Kaye



Average rating: 4.18 · 608 ratings · 87 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
Gods of the Morning: A Bird...

4.28 avg rating — 228 ratings — published 2015 — 7 editions
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The Dun Cow Rib: A Very Nat...

4.21 avg rating — 133 ratings — published 2017 — 5 editions
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Song of the Rolling Earth

4.10 avg rating — 72 ratings — published 2003 — 5 editions
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At the Water's Edge: A Pers...

4.03 avg rating — 107 ratings — published 2010 — 4 editions
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Nature's Child

4.16 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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The White Island

4.35 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1972 — 3 editions
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The Seeing Eye

4.67 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1980
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One For Sorrow

3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1994
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Seal Cull: The Grey Seal Co...

it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1979
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Song of the Rolling Earth: ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
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More books by John Lister-Kaye…
“I draw comfort from the notion that nature reveals its motivations only slowly; mysteries within mysteries that keep us arrogant, would-be know-alls firmly in our place.”
John Lister-Kaye, Gods of the Morning: A Bird's-Eye View of a Changing World

“I marvel at animal behaviour but it never surprises me. Nature has had a long time to hone its secret skills.”
John Lister-Kaye, Gods of the Morning: A Bird's-Eye View of a Changing World

“Nature writers are supposed to be able to summon from the literary ether the precise words to describe their subjects or the feelings they evince. Sometimes the Muse attends, but by no means on demand. It is one of the great delights of trying to be a writer that words can suddenly appear, like blackcap's jubilant song, absent for months and then unexpectedly and ecstatically there, winging into your head just when you need them most. The more emotive the subject or the more deeply personal the experience, the easier it ought to be. But not necessarily so. Some experiences transcend ready description as though making a point: words - at least those available to the generality of writers - sometimes fall hopelessly short; they dish out despair in bucket loads. Others fare much better.”
John Lister-Kaye

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