Elizabeth Rush



Average rating: 4.23 · 620 ratings · 131 reviews · 6 distinct worksSimilar authors
Rising: Dispatches from the...

4.24 avg rating — 606 ratings — published 2018 — 7 editions
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Lost & Found Hanoi

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2014
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M is for Myanmar

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3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2011
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Still Lifes from a Vanishin...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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I is for Indonesia

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2013
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H is for Hanoi

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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More books by Elizabeth Rush…

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“We are individually preoccupied by the lives of those we know and expect to know: our grandparents, parents, children, and, if we are lucky, grandchildren. Which is why it is so fantastically difficult for us to recognize that in our frenzied attempt to keep nearly eight billion people fed, watered, clothed, sheltered, and distracted, we are fundamentally altering the geophysical composition of the planet at a pace previously caused only by cataclysmic events, like the massive asteroid that smashed into eastern Mexico, wiping out the dinosaurs, sixty-five million years ago.”
Elizabeth Rush, Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore

“I call this new form of climate anxiety endsickness. Like motion sickness or sea sickness, endsickness is its own kind of vertigo—a physical response to living in a world that is moving in unusual ways, toward what I imagine as a kind of event horizon.”
Elizabeth Rush, Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore

“in the latter half of 2017, ten consecutive storms became hurricanes. The last time this occurred was in 1893—and many meteorologists are skeptical of that, because technology and thus tracking were so much less advanced then. But in 2017 we had our cell phones out and the tidal gauges turned on. Together we bore witness to a string of storms so powerful that the National Weather Service had to invent not one but two entirely new colors to reflect their severity.”
Elizabeth Rush, Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore



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