Meryle Secrest



Meryle Secrest was born and educated in Bath, England, and lives in Washington, DC. She is the author of twelve biographies and was awarded the 2006 Presidential National Humanities Medal.

Average rating: 3.85 · 1,561 ratings · 188 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
Stephen Sondheim: A life

4.11 avg rating — 614 ratings — published 1998 — 10 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Frank Lloyd Wright: A Biogr...

3.82 avg rating — 298 ratings — published 1992 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Modigliani: A Life

3.78 avg rating — 139 ratings — published 2011 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Elsa Schiaparelli: A Biography

3.35 avg rating — 172 ratings — published 2014 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Leonard Bernstein: A Life

3.77 avg rating — 57 ratings — published 1994 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Duveen: A Life in Art

4.02 avg rating — 57 ratings — published 2004 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Salvador Dali

3.32 avg rating — 47 ratings — published 1946 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Mysterious Affair at Ol...

3.22 avg rating — 41 ratings — published 2019 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Between Me and Life: A Biog...

3.97 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 1974 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Somewhere for Me - A Biogra...

3.95 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 2001 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Meryle Secrest…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“First take a play that you like and musicalize it. Then take a play that you like but you feel has flaws and try to improve them, and musicalize it,” Sondheim recalled him saying. “Then he said, ‘Take something that is not a play but that somebody else has written, a novel or a short story, so that you don’t have to invent the characters or plot, and musicalize that, make it into a play. Dramatize it. And then finally write an original, your own story, and dramatize that.”
Meryle Secrest, Stephen Sondheim: A life

“the disappearance of an audience that had supported experimentation and made such works financial, as well as critical, successes. The decline of liberal-arts teaching in schools and colleges meant that the new audience was less cultured and intellectually oriented; wedded to television and movies, it wanted to be entertained rather than challenged.”
Meryle Secrest, Stephen Sondheim: A life

“Despite, or because of their faith in miraculous cures, a strain of superstitious belief ran through this proud, emotionally distant family of intellectuals.”
Meryle Secrest, Modigliani: A Life

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
Nothing But Readi...: This topic has been closed to new comments. Level 1 of the Serious Reader Challenge for 2017 249 1141 Dec 25, 2017 05:27PM  
All About Books: I'd like to try reading...what would you recommend? 364 386 Mar 05, 2019 07:47AM  
Gigi's Company: Title Game 6157 1362 19 hours, 43 min ago  


Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Meryle to Goodreads.