Charlton Ogburn Jr.

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Charlton Ogburn Jr.


Born
in Atlanta, Georgia, The United States
March 15, 1911

Died
October 19, 1998

Genre


Charlton Ogburn, Jr. was an author and freelance professional writer. He was the author of over a dozen books and numerous magazine articles. The Marauders (1959), his first person account of the Burma Campaign in World War II, may be his best-known work; it was later made into the film Merrill's Marauders (1962). His account of his travels along the largely deserted north eastern shore in The Winter Beach is considered a classic of nature-writing. ...more

Average rating: 4.07 · 176 ratings · 33 reviews · 16 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Mysterious William Shak...

4.19 avg rating — 57 ratings — published 1984 — 4 editions
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The Marauders

3.91 avg rating — 34 ratings — published 1959 — 4 editions
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The Winter Beach

4.47 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 1966 — 3 editions
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The Man Who Was Shakespeare...

4.53 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 1995
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Railroads: The Great Americ...

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4.13 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 1977 — 2 editions
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Big Caesar

3.50 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1957 — 2 editions
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The Southern Appalachians: ...

4.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1975 — 2 editions
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The Adventure Of Birds

3.33 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1976 — 2 editions
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Reader's Digest Condensed B...

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3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1958
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Winespring Mountain

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1973
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More books by Charlton Ogburn Jr.…
“Circumstances are seldom right. You never have the capacities, the strength, the wisdom, the virtue you ought to have. You must always do with less than you need in a situation vastly different from what you would have chosen.”
Charlton Ogburn Jr.

“We trained hard, but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. Presumably the plans for our employment were being changed. I was to learn later in life that, perhaps because we are so good at organizing, we tend as a nation to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency and demoralization.”
Charlton Ogburn Jr.