Darrell J. Fasching



Average rating: 3.74 · 184 ratings · 15 reviews · 11 distinct worksSimilar authors
Comparative Religious Ethic...

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3.95 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 2001 — 8 editions
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The Thought of Jacques Ellu...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1981
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The Coming of the Millenniu...

3.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1996 — 3 editions
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Narrative Theology After Au...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1992 — 2 editions
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The Ethical Challenge of Au...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1993 — 3 editions
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No One Left Behind: Is Univ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2011 — 4 editions
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Jewish People in Christian ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1985
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Religion and Globalization:...

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4.08 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2007
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World Religions Today

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3.67 avg rating — 103 ratings — published 2001 — 10 editions
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Religions of Asia Today

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3.14 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2008 — 4 editions
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“Every act, says Thich Nhat Hanh, should be a ritual of mindfulness awakening us to our true identity of interbeing. “True mind is our real self, is the Buddha: the pure one-ness which cannot be cut up by the illusory divisions of separate selves, created by concepts and language” (Naht Hanh, 1975, p. 42).”
Darrell J. Fasching, Comparative Religious Ethics: A Narrative Approach to Global Ethics

“The depth psychologist C.G. Jung, himself deeply influenced by Augustine, divided life into two halves (see Figure 6.2, Jung’s Stages of Life). He argued that we live the first half of life on the sheer energy of being youthful biological organisms. The tasks of this stage of life are dominated by the biological need for the reproduction of the species and the social need to reproduce the collective wisdom of one’s culture through education. Then, somewhere around the middle of life,it finally hits you one day that half your life is over, that your youth is past and that time is slipping away from you. In your youth it seemed as if you had all the time in the world and as if you could do anything. Now you come to face the fact that time is running out and there are some things you will never accomplish. Mid-life is the point at which we reach the apex of the biological curve of life, that turning point where youth gives way to the inevitable processes of aging, sickness, and death. This is the life cycle of all living things, plant, animal or human.Inthe case of humans, however, we are conscious of our mortality, an awareness that sends us on a quest, seeking for a personal answer to the problem of death as a loss of self as the second half of our life looms before us. As”
Darrell J. Fasching, Comparative Religious Ethics: A Narrative Approach to Global Ethics

“In 1976 he was part of a rescue operation in the Gulf of Siam to save the “boat people” fleeing persecution in Vietnam. The governments of Malaysia, Thailand, and Singapore were refusing to allow them to land and sending them back into the sea and almost certain death.Many died, but Nhat Hanh and others rescued around 800 people. In one case a group of Vietnamese landed in Malaysia and destroyed their boat so that they could not be forced back to the sea. Nhat Hanh and his companions manned rescue boats, struggled with government bureaucrats, and alerted the international press. They struggled mightily to do everything in their power to save lives. At one point the authorities in Singapore arrested them and refused to allow them to give the boat people any further aid.”
Darrell J. Fasching, Comparative Religious Ethics: A Narrative Approach to Global Ethics



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