Liz Kelly

Liz Kelly


Website

Genre


Liz Kelly is Professor of Sexualised Violence at London Metropolitan University, where she is also Director of the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit (CWASU). She has been active in the field of violence against women and children for almost 30 years.

Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the Goodreads database with this name.

Average rating: 4.49 · 80 ratings · 8 reviews · 22 distinct works
Mr. Wrong: Heroes of Henderson

4.70 avg rating — 33 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Heroes of Henderson Boxed S...

4.40 avg rating — 15 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Surviving Sexual Violence

4.29 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1988 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Heroes of Henderson Boxed S...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 5 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Heros of Henderson Boxed Se...

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Mr. Wrong: Heroes of Hender...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Moving in the Shadows: Viol...

by
0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Moving in the Shadows: Viol...

by
0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Moving in the Shadows: Viol...

by
0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Top Dog: Heroes of Henderso...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Liz Kelly…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“- Rape is a unique crime, representing both a physical and psychological violation.
More than with any other crime the victim can experience reporting rape as a form of revictimisation.
l In no other crime is the victim subject to so much scrutiny at trial, where the most likely defence is that the victim consented to the crime. Powerful stereotypes function to limit the definition of what counts as ‘real rape’."
Kelly, L., Lovett, J., & Regan, L. (2005). A gap or a chasm?: attrition in reported rape cases. London: Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate.”
Liz Kelly

“Police recording of false allegations of rape:
"The data on the pro formas limit the extent to which one can assess the police designations, but their internal rules on false complaints specify that this category should be limited to cases where either there is a clear and credible admission by the complainants, or where there are strong evidential grounds. On this basis, and bearing in mind the data limitations, for the cases where there is information (n=144) the designation of false complaint could be said to be probable (primarily those where the account by the complainant is referred to) in 44 cases, possible (primarily where there is some evidential basis) in a further 33 cases, and uncertain (including where victim characteristics are used to impute that they are inherently less believable) in 77 cases. If the proportion of false complaints on the basis of the probable and possible cases are recalculated, rates of three per cent are obtained, both of all reported cases (n=67 of 2,643), and of those where the outcome is known (n=67 of 2,284). Even if all those designated false by the police were accepted (a figure of approximately ten per cent), this is still much lower than the rate perceived by police officers interviewed in this study. A question asked of all of them was how they assessed truth and falsity in allegations and within this, 50 per cent (n=31) further discussed the issue of false allegations."
A gap or a chasm?: attrition in reported rape cases.”
Liz Kelly

“Summary
There is a small group of cases, initially treated as rape where there is no evidence of an assault: primarily where a third party makes the report and the victim subsequently denies; or where the victim suspects being assaulted while asleep, unconscious or affected by alcohol/drugs but the medical/forensic examination suggests no sex has taken place. How the police should designate such cases is problematic.
- Eight per cent of reported cases in the sample were designated false by the police.
- A higher proportion of cases designated false involved 16- to 25-year-olds.
- A greater degree of acquaintance between victim and perpetrator decreased the likelihood of cases being designated false.
- Cases were most commonly designated false on the grounds of: the complainant
admitting it; retractions; evidential issues; and non co-operation by the complainant.
- In a number of cases the police also cited mental health problems, previous allegations, use of alcohol/drugs and lack of CCTV evidence.
- The pro formas and the interviews with police officers suggested inconsistencies in the complainant’s account could be interpreted as ‘lying’.
- The authors’ analysis suggests that the designation of false allegations in a number of cases was uncertain according to Home Office counting rules, and if these were excluded, would reduce the proportion of false complaints to three per cent of reported cases.
- This is considerably lower than the estimates of police officers interviewed."

A gap or a chasm?: attrition in reported rape cases.”
Liz Kelly



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Liz to Goodreads.