Ian Osborn



Average rating: 4.19 · 290 ratings · 33 reviews · 6 distinct worksSimilar authors
Tormenting Thoughts and Sec...

4.18 avg rating — 157 ratings — published 1998 — 6 editions
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Can Christianity Cure Obses...

4.18 avg rating — 122 ratings — published 2008 — 4 editions
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The Rough Guide to Fiji

4.60 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2008 — 7 editions
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Bado Kidogo (Ian Osborn

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2011
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Rotuma Through the Eyes of ...

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Game Boy Pocket Power Guide...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1997
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More books by Ian Osborn…
“Major depression also appears to have become unusually widespread in the late Renaissance. This disorder is diagnosed when a person shows a severely depressed mood, a loss of interest and motivation, and withdraws from usual activities. In Elizabethan Malady, Lawrence Babb analyzes references to melancholy in diverse literary works, finding that while they are almost nonexistent in the early Renaissance, by the 1600s they are a principal theme in prose, drama, and biography. Babb concludes that the late Renaissance was characterized by “an epidemic of melancholy.” The poet John Donne, who offered sonnets to the “Holy Sadness of the Soul,” provided a vivid description of this malady, which he himself knew well: “God has seen fit to give us the dregs of misery, an extraordinary sadness, a predominant melancholy, a faintness of heart, a cheerlessness, a joylessness of spirit.”
Ian Osborn, Can Christianity Cure Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?: A Psychiatrist Explores the Role of Faith in Treatment

“By emphasizing God’s mercy, more infinite than a parent’s for a child, she found salvation in her own weakness. “Sanctity,” Thérèse explains to her sister, is “a disposition of heart which is confident to the point of audacity in the goodness of our Father.”
Ian Osborn, Can Christianity Cure Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?: A Psychiatrist Explores the Role of Faith in Treatment

“Finally, Luther, Bunyan, and Thérèse all developed mature religious philosophies that differed from those of their communities because (from a psychiatric standpoint) each needed desperately to find a cure for obsessions and compulsions and, in order to do so, needed to find an entirely new perspective from which to view obsessional fears.”
Ian Osborn, Can Christianity Cure Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?: A Psychiatrist Explores the Role of Faith in Treatment



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