Stewart Ross

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Born
in Aylesbury, The United Kingdom
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Influences
Great-grandfather, 6th form, Charles Dickens, William Shakespeare, Mar ...more

Member Since
May 2011

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Stewart Ross has written more than 300 titles, fiction and non-fiction, for children and adults. Many are about (or inspired by) history. He lives near Canterbury, England.

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Stewart Ross I'd be transported to the Forty Acre Wood where I'd become a bear with very little brain.…moreI'd be transported to the Forty Acre Wood where I'd become a bear with very little brain.(less)
Stewart Ross Pat Barker and more Donna Tartt
Average rating: 3.82 · 1,606 ratings · 351 reviews · 294 distinct worksSimilar authors
Into the Unknown: How Great...

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4.23 avg rating — 266 ratings — published 2010 — 5 editions
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Understand the Middle East ...

3.81 avg rating — 62 ratings — published 2010 — 6 editions
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Solve it Like Sherlock: Tes...

3.39 avg rating — 85 ratings8 editions
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The Israeli-Palestinian Con...

3.77 avg rating — 78 ratings — published 2007 — 7 editions
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Charlotte Bronte and Jane Eyre

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4.05 avg rating — 44 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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Twisted Fairy Tales: The Th...

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4.16 avg rating — 63 ratings — published 2020 — 3 editions
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Twisted Fairy Tales: The Ni...

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4.05 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 2020 — 2 editions
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The Soterion Mission

3.15 avg rating — 66 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
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Dundee's Dark Side

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3.73 avg rating — 30 ratings
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Twisted Fairy Tales: Snow W...

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4.13 avg rating — 46 ratings — published 2020 — 3 editions
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LONELY PLANET

Very excited to be writing about China for LONELY PLANET's fantastic series of books to  inspire young travellers and help them learn about the world! 
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Published on July 20, 2016 02:58
The Soterion Mission Revenge of the Zeds The Salvation Project
(3 books)
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3.40 avg rating — 96 ratings

The Star Houses: A Story fr...
(1 book)
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3.68 avg rating — 22 ratings

The Three Little Narwhals a...
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4.13 avg rating — 8 ratings

Moon (Nonfiction)
1 chapters   —   updated May 13, 2015 06:31PM
Description: Apollo 11 - and beyond!
Into the Unknown (History)
1 chapters   —   updated May 13, 2015 06:31PM
Description: A History of Exploration
The Soterion Mission (Science Fiction & Fantasy)
1 chapters   —   updated Jan 09, 2013 01:11PM
Description: The world in 2106 after the seemingly innocuous 2017 epidemic of Mini-flu ...
Americanah
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The Ghost Road
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The Reef
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Summer by Edith Wharton
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Mature, slightly cynical, wise, powerful. A must read for all grown-ups.
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Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton
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Great little book. The poignancy of Stoner, the bleakness of A Farewell to Arms.
Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton
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Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton
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Great little book. The poignancy of Stoner, the bleakness of A Farewell to Arms.
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Henry Miller on Writing by Henry Miller
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Not great.
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Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
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William Shakespeare
“All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages.”
William Shakespeare, As You Like It

Charles Dickens
“LONDON. Michaelmas Term lately over, and the Lord Chancellor sitting in Lincoln’s Inn Hall. Implacable November weather. As much mud in the streets as if the waters had but newly retired from the face of the earth, and it would not be wonderful to meet a Megalosaurus, forty feet long or so, waddling like an elephantine lizard up Holborn Hill. Smoke lowering down from chimney-pots, making a soft black drizzle, with flakes of soot in it as big as full-grown snow-flakes — gone into mourning, one might imagine, for the death of the sun. Dogs, undistinguishable in mire. Horses, scarcely better; splashed to their very blinkers. Foot passengers, jostling one another’s umbrellas in a general infection of ill-temper, and losing their foot-hold at street-corners, where tens of thousands of other foot passengers have been slipping and sliding since the day broke (if the day ever broke), adding new deposits to the crust upon crust of mud, sticking at those points tenaciously to the pavement, and accumulating at compound interest.

Fog everywhere. Fog up the river, where it flows among green aits and meadows; fog down the river, where it rolls defiled among the tiers of shipping and the waterside pollutions of a great (and dirty) city. Fog on the Essex marshes, fog on the Kentish heights. Fog creeping into the cabooses of collier-brigs; fog lying out on the yards, and hovering in the rigging of great ships; fog drooping on the gunwales of barges and small boats. Fog in the eyes and throats of ancient Greenwich pensioners, wheezing by the firesides of their wards; fog in the stem and bowl of the afternoon pipe of the wrathful skipper, down in his close cabin; fog cruelly pinching the toes and fingers of his shivering little ’prentice boy on deck. Chance people on the bridges peeping over the parapets into a nether sky of fog, with fog all round them, as if they were up in a balloon, and hanging in the misty clouds.

Gas looming through the fog in divers places in the streets, much as the sun may, from the spongey fields, be seen to loom by husbandman and ploughboy. Most of the shops lighted two hours before their time — as the gas seems to know, for it has a haggard and unwilling look.

The raw afternoon is rawest, and the dense fog is densest, and the muddy streets are muddiest near that leaden-headed old obstruction, appropriate ornament for the threshold of a leaden-headed old corporation, Temple Bar. And hard by Temple Bar, in Lincoln’s Inn Hall, at the very heart of the fog, sits the Lord High Chancellor in his High Court of Chancery.”
Charles Dickens, Bleak House

Laurence Sterne
“I have a strong propensity in me to begin this chapter very nonsensically, and I will not balk my fancy.--Accordingly I set off thus:”
Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Charles Dickens
“Dead, your Majesty. Dead, my lords and gentlemen. Dead, Right Reverends and Wrong Reverends of every order. Dead, men and women, born with Heavenly compassion in your hearts. And dying thus around us every day.”
Charles Dickens, Bleak House

Charles Dickens
“A word in earnest is as good as a speech.”
Charles Dickens, Bleak House




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