Martin Odersky



Average rating: 4.18 · 1,702 ratings · 109 reviews · 10 distinct worksSimilar authors
Programming in Scala

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4.21 avg rating — 1,481 ratings — published 2008 — 8 editions
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Scala By Example

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 2014
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Scala スケーラブルプログラミング: コンセプト ...

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4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2009
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ECOOP 2004 - Object-Oriente...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2004 — 3 editions
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Scala in Depth

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3.90 avg rating — 193 ratings — published 2012
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Abstract State Machines - T...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2000 — 2 editions
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Domain-Specific Program Gen...

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Compiler Construction: 16th...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2007 — 3 editions
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Domain-Specific Program Gen...

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Scala in Depth

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“Inheriting from Application is shorter than writing an explicit main method, but it also has some shortcomings. First, you can't use this trait if you need to access command-line arguments, because the args array isn't available. For example, because the Summer application uses command-line arguments, it must be written with an explicit main method, as shown in Listing 4.3. Second, because of some restrictions in the JVM threading model, you need an explicit main method if your program is multi-threaded. Finally, some implementations of the JVM do not optimize the initialization code of an object which is executed by the Application trait. So you should inherit from Application only when your program is relatively simple and single-threaded.”
Martin Odersky, Programming in Scala

“You may be wondering why you can't access the elements of a tuple like the elements of a list, for example, with "pair(0)". The reason is that a list's apply method always returns the same type, but each element of a tuple may be a different type: _1 can have one result type, _2 another, and so on.”
Martin Odersky, Programming in Scala

“The line in question ends in a word that would not be legal as the end of a statement, such as a period or an infix operator. The next line begins with a word that cannot start a statement. The line ends while inside parentheses (...) or brackets [...], because these cannot contain multiple statements anyway.”
Martin Odersky, Programming in Scala



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