Alexandra Lehmann

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New York, New York, The United States
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June 2016


Alexandra Lehmann received her Bachelor of Arts, cum laude, from the State University of New York at Albany in Political Science and German. Her German fluency is born of heritage and studying Germanistik at universities in Wuerzburg, Braunschweig, and Munich.​​ After nearly a decade of working in New York City as a copywriter and in Munich as a translator, Alexandra continued her Masters of Fine Arts in Nonfiction Writing from Sarah Lawerence College in Bronxville, New York. She completed her graduate thesis under the guidance of Vijay Seshadri. It compared the letters and diaries of Sophie Scholl and Anne Frank. Yad Vashem in Jerusalem requested a copy for their research library.

With a Fulbright Scholarship, Alexandra began archival rese
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Alexandra Lehmann The original idea for "With You There Is Light" originally came from "negative motivation." I grew up in New York in a time when being of German herit…moreThe original idea for "With You There Is Light" originally came from "negative motivation." I grew up in New York in a time when being of German heritage meant being called a "Nazi." As a sensitive kind of person, being called this hurt a lot. My mother, who survived World War 2 in a "Nazi" orphanage, retreated completely from upper to middle class society in a suburb outside of the City. As a writer, I wanted to urgently dispel this notion and encourage Americans to think about how Germans lived under Hitler. Living without personal freedoms and in my mother and father's case, being victims of extreme hardship (children living with starvation and untold violence) is also a form of suffering. Sophie Scholl and Fritz Hartnagel's story perfectly shows how two brave and extraordinary young people were caught on opposite sides of war - fought to know the truth - and acted on it. Eventually, I began to see that their love story was the truer narrative thread, and although I am not sure I am enough of a writer to be able to capture it, I tried and hope my readers may think that I did.(less)
Alexandra Lehmann There isn't too many great things about being a writer if work is supposed to translate into money, income and/or recognition. The one truly wonderful…moreThere isn't too many great things about being a writer if work is supposed to translate into money, income and/or recognition. The one truly wonderful thing about being a writer, however, is the ability to see and be in the world as someone who desperately wants to make sense of it. I'm not saying non-writers (or those who do not write) don't want to make sense of it. What I mean more specifically is that writers must write it all down. They are compelled to record whatever it is that they see, hear, taste, touch or smell that makes no sense to them, and in their recording, try to make sense of it. Its a lifelong ambition. I like that about being a writer. I do not have to think about retiring.(less)
Average rating: 4.21 · 28 ratings · 8 reviews · 1 distinct workSimilar authors
With You There Is Light: Ba...

4.21 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 2016 — 3 editions
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Reading to the Religious: With You There Is Light

Alexandra Lehmann reads at St. James in North Salem, New York

Reading at St. James in North Salem, New York


November 26, 2017


After Service at the St. James Episcopal Church, North Salem, New York


The first excerpt I read last Sunday came from Chapter Three of “With You There Is Light.” Sophie Scholl attended St. Georges, the Protestant Church in Ulm, with her mother. Sophie noted reading Exodus 17:11 in her journal so I imagined and wrote about a sermon wh

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Published on December 04, 2017 18:24

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“Laws always change, Herr Mohr. You know that. I obeyed the law of my conscience. The law that never changes. The law that must be obeyed when political law breaks all moral authority.”
Alexandra Lehmann, With You There Is Light: Based on the True Story about Sophie Scholl and Fritz Hartnagel

“We look in the mirror and see the shades of other faces looking back through the years; we see the shape of memory, standing solid in an empty doorway. By blood and by choice, we make our ghosts; we haunt ourselves.”
Diana Gabaldon, Drums of Autumn

“If the injustice is part of the necessary friction of the machine of government, let it go, let it go: perchance it will wear smooth--certainly the machine will wear out… but if it is of such a nature that it requires you to be the agent of injustice to another, then I say, break the law. Let your life be a counter-friction to stop the machine. What I have to do is to see, at any rate, that I do not lend myself to the wrong which I condemn.”
Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience and Other Essays

“I wish my countrymen to consider, that whatever the human law may be, neither an individual nor a nation can ever commit the least act of injustice against the obscurest individual, without having to pay the penalty for it. A government which deliberately enacts injustice, and persists in it, will at length ever become the laughing-stock of the world.”
Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience and Other Essays

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