Dan Hassler-Forest


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Dan Hassler-Forest

Goodreads Author


Born
New York, The United States
Twitter

Genre

Influences

Member Since
August 2012


Dan Hassler-Forest is assistant professor of media and cultural studies at Utrecht University. He publishes widely on media convergence, genre cinema, critical theory, and zombies. He loves playing the ukulele and someday hopes to master the banjo.

Average rating: 3.71 · 68 ratings · 9 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
Capitalist Superheroes: Cap...

3.71 avg rating — 41 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Science Fiction, Fantasy, a...

4.18 avg rating — 11 ratings4 editions
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Transmedia: Verhalen Vertel...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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Star Wars and the History o...

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The Politics of Adaptation:...

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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The Rise and Reason of Comi...

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3.20 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
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Handbook of Comics and Grap...

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The Oxford Handbook of Comi...

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More books by Dan Hassler-Forest…

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Colonialism and t...
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Sounding Like a N...
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The Black Atlanti...
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Dan’s Recent Updates

Dan is currently reading
Colonialism and the Emergence of Science Fiction by John Rieder
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Class, Race and Marxism by David Roediger
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Very strong collection of essays from various periods in Roediger's long and illustrious career as a historian, sociologist and theorist of American race studies.
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Futures of Black Radicalism by Gaye Theresa Johnson
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A truly superb collection of essays that further develop the great Cedric J. Robinson's work on black Marxism, racial capitalism, and theories (and practices!) of black radicalism. Wide-ranging but impeccably structured, and each and every one a ...more
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Afrofuturism 2.0 by Reynaldo Anderson
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There are some good essays in here and the topic is on fire, but the level of writing is inconsistent, too many authors waste a lot of time laboriously introducing their own (largely similar) definitions of Afrofuturism, the editing is downright ...more
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Sounding Like a No-No by Francesca T. Royster
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Black Macho and the Myth of the Superwoman by Michele Wallace
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A rousingly polemical intervention that’s so forceful and articulate in its writing that it sweeps you along even as it generalizes so broadly and reads both culture and history so selectively that it obviously pushes way too far in a single ...more
Dan started reading
The Black Atlantic by Paul Gilroy
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Afrofuturism Rising by Isiah Lavender III
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A thoughtful and provocative study of literary precursors to the Afrofuturist movement, skillfully and convincing locating traces of science-fictional thinking in black authors whose works are rarely considered in those categories.
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Black Utopia by Alex Zamalin
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A forcefully written, wonderfully precise and articulate, and astonishingly concise literary history of black utopian thinking. Rather than an encyclopedic overview, Zamalin wisely selects a few key works by singular black writers from the 19th ...more
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Futures of Black Radicalism by Gaye Theresa Johnson
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More of Dan's books…
“Bruce Wayne’s childhood experience of losing his parents during a random back-alley mugging remains the primary origin story for the Batman character, but other than irrationally (or, more accurately: insanely) motivating his desire to fight crime, the trauma seems to have had little discernable effect on his character.”
Dan Hassler-Forest, Capitalist Superheroes: Caped Crusaders in the Neoliberal Age

“Significantly, Superman’s first scene shows Jor-El rendering judgment, his deciding vote imposing the “Law of the Father ” on the criminal General Zod and his two followers, whose removal from Krypton’s symbolic order figuratively represents the castration associated with patriarchal punishment.”
Dan Hassler-Forest, Capitalist Superheroes: Caped Crusaders in the Neoliberal Age

Topics Mentioning This Author

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The Book Vipers: * Last book(s) you acquired 1292 485 Jan 19, 2020 01:23PM  
“To be white, or straight, or male, or middle class is to be simultaneously ubiquitious and invisible. You’re everywhere you look, you’re the standard against which everyone else is measured. You’re like water, like air. People will tell you they went to see a “woman doctor” or they will say they went to see “the doctor.” People will tell you they have a “gay colleague” or they’ll tell you about a colleague. A white person will be happy to tell you about a “Black friend,” but when that same person simply mentions a “friend,” everyone will assume the person is white. Any college course that doesn’t have the word “woman” or “gay” or “minority” in its title is a course about men, heterosexuals, and white people. But we call those courses “literature,” “history” or “political science.”

This invisibility is political.”
Michael S. Kimmel, Privilege: A Reader

“There are too many books I haven’t read, too many places I haven’t seen, too many memories I haven’t kept long enough.”
Irwin Shaw

“The notion that capital – as an infinitely ramified system of exploitation, an abstract, intangible but overpowering logic, a process without a subject or a subject without a face – poses formidable obstacles to its representation has often been taken in a sublime or tragic key. *Vast*, beyond the powers of individual or collective cognition; *invisible*, in its fundamental forms; *overwhelming*, in its capacity to reshape space, time and matter – but unlike the sublime, or indeed the tragic, in its propensity to thwart any reaffirmation of the uniqueness and interiority of a subject. Not a shipwreck *with* a spectator, but a shipwreck *of* the spectator.”
Alberto Toscano




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