Rich Silvers

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Rich Silvers

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Born
Bronx, New York
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Member Since
June 2012


Rich Silvers’ first career took him to the finance departments of a number of Fortune 500 consumer product companies, but he retired at 48 to pursue his lifetime dream of becoming a novelist. Born in the Bronx, Rich now lives in Yorktown Heights, NY, with his wife Cathy and their pet parrot, DJ.

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Rich Silvers The question could also be posed as: was Fitzgerald a romantic or an egoist? Part of me wants to say both. He used the term “romantic egoist” in his f…moreThe question could also be posed as: was Fitzgerald a romantic or an egoist? Part of me wants to say both. He used the term “romantic egoist” in his first novel “This Side of Paradise.” I think it’s good if a writer has some of each. The romantic makes you yearn to write. The egoist makes you believe you can. Fitzgerald said, “I am not a great man, but sometimes, I think the impersonal and objective quality of my talent, and the sacrifices of it, in pieces, to preserve its essential value has some sort of epic grandeur.” He refers to the sacrifices “of” his talent, (not “for” it). I construe both his drinking and Zelda as two of those sacrifices, though ironically, Zelda was also his muse. He also said he left his capacity for hoping on the “little” roads that led from Zelda’s sanitarium, and therefore, I’d like to believe he was more of a romantic and “Tender is the Night” reflected his hope for Zelda.(less)
Rich Silvers My favorite couple is Dick and Nicole Diver from the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel “Tender is the Night.” Diver is a psychiatrist and his wife is wealthy,…moreMy favorite couple is Dick and Nicole Diver from the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel “Tender is the Night.” Diver is a psychiatrist and his wife is wealthy, exquisite, and mentally troubled. Dick tries to save her and loses himself in the process. It’s a tragic story, an example of how complex love can be when two people are drawn to each other, but there are destructive aspects to their union as well. The Divers echo the relationship that Fitzgerald had with his wife, Zelda, who battled her own demons—unsuccessfully. One of Fitzgerald’s noted quotes is: “I left my capacity for hoping on the little roads that led to Zelda’s sanitarium.”(less)
Average rating: 3.37 · 427 ratings · 72 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
Have You Seen Her?

3.33 avg rating — 384 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Don't Remember

3.70 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 2016 — 2 editions
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Sciatica

In 2004, I was having a complicated oral surgery. It required general anesthesia and it would be my first time in an operating room. As a writer, I always keep an eye out for such unique observation opportunities, no matter what the situation. Therefore, I was a bit excited about what I was about to experience, and because I had a lot of faith in the doctor, I wasn’t worried about the outcome. Iro

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Published on October 30, 2017 13:10

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How Not to Die by Michael Greger
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Annie Dillard
“He is careful of what he reads, for that is what he will write. He is careful of what he learns, for that is what he will know.”
Annie Dillard, The Writing Life




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