Jerry Windley-Daoust

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Jerry Windley-Daoust

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May 2012

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Average rating: 4.1 · 29 ratings · 3 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
77 Ways to Pray With Your Kids

4.56 avg rating — 9 ratings
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Living Justice And Peace: C...

3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2001 — 4 editions
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Primary Source Readings in ...

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The Stations of the Cross f...

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The Glorious Mysteries: Ill...

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77 Ways To Pray With Your Kids

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Lectio Divina for Teens: Re...

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Touching the Hearts of Teen...

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Answering God's Call to Cov...

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David Foster Wallace nails it

So, I woke up to the Writer's Almanac this morning, and was delighted to hear heard this pithy and true quote from David Foster Wallace:

"Postmodern irony and cynicism's become an end in itself, a measure of hip sophistication and literary savvy. Few artists dare to try to talk about ways of working toward redeeming what's wrong, because they'll look sentimental and naive to all the weary ironis... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on February 21, 2013 19:48

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More of Jerry's books…
“Pope John XXIII: “Prayer is the raising of the mind to God. We must always remember this. The actual words matter less.”
Jerry Windley-Daoust, 77 Ways to Pray With Your Kids

“Postmodern irony and cynicism's become an end in itself, a measure of hip sophistication and literary savvy. Few artists dare to try to talk about ways of working toward redeeming what's wrong, because they'll look sentimental and naive to all the weary ironists. Irony's gone from liberating to enslaving. ... The postmodern founders' patricidal work was great, but patricide produces orphans, and no amount of revelry can make up for the fact that writers my age have been literary orphans throughout our formative years.”
David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest

“The really important kind of freedom involves attention, and awareness, and discipline, and effort, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them, over and over, in myriad petty little unsexy ways, every day.”
David Foster Wallace, This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life

“Because here's something else that's weird but true: in the day-to day trenches of adult life, there is actually no such thing as atheism. There is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship. And the compelling reason for maybe choosing some sort of god or spiritual-type thing to worship—be it JC or Allah, be it YHWH or the Wiccan Mother Goddess, or the Four Noble Truths, or some inviolable set of ethical principles—is that pretty much anything else you worship will eat you alive. If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough. It's the truth. Worship your body and beauty and sexual allure and you will always feel ugly. And when time and age start showing, you will die a million deaths before they finally grieve you. On one level, we all know this stuff already. It's been codified as myths, proverbs, clichés, epigrams, parables; the skeleton of every great story. The whole trick is keeping the truth up front in daily consciousness.”
David Foster Wallace , This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life

“What passes for hip cynical transcendence of sentiment is really some kind of fear of being really human, since to be really human [...] is probably to be unavoidably sentimental and naïve and goo-prone and generally pathetic.”
David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest

“We're all lonely for something we don't know we're lonely for. How else to explain the curious feeling that goes around feeling like missing somebody we've never even met?”
David Foster Wallace




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