Leslie Valiant

Leslie Valiant’s Followers (9)

member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo

Leslie Valiant


Born
in Budapest, Hungary
March 28, 1949

Website

Genre


Leslie Valiant FRS is a British computer scientist and computational theorist. He is currently the T. Jefferson Coolidge Professor of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics at Harvard University, and was educated at King's College, Cambridge, Imperial College London, and University of Warwick where he received a PhD in computer science in 1974.

Valiant is world-renowned for his work in theoretical computer science. Among his many contributions to complexity theory, he introduced the notion of #P-completeness to explain why enumeration and reliability problems are intractable. He also introduced the "probably approximately correct" (PAC) model of machine learning that has helped the field of computational learning theory grow, and the conce
...more

Average rating: 3.7 · 394 ratings · 41 reviews · 3 distinct worksSimilar authors
Probably Approximately Corr...

3.67 avg rating — 382 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Circuits of the Mind

4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1994 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Probably Approximately Corr...

4.80 avg rating — 5 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating

* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Quotes by Leslie Valiant  (?)
Quotes are added by the Goodreads community and are not verified by Goodreads. (Learn more)

“machine learning is the general field that studies how complex mechanisms can be created without a designer.”
Leslie Valiant, Probably Approximately Correct: Nature's Algorithms for Learning and Prospering in a Complex World

“philosopher Sextus Empiricus wrote some 1,800 years ago: [The dogmatists] claim that the universal is established from the particulars by means of induction. If this is so, they will effect it by reviewing either all the particulars or only some of them. But if they review only some, their induction will be unreliable, since it is possible that some of the particulars omitted in the induction may contradict the universal. If, on the other hand, their review is to include all the particulars, theirs will be an impossible task, because particulars are infinite and indefinite. Thus it turns out, I think, that induction, viewed from both ways, rests on a shaky foundation. 4”
Leslie Valiant, Probably Approximately Correct: Nature's Algorithms for Learning and Prospering in a Complex World



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Leslie to Goodreads.