Michel de Certeau


Born
in Chambéry, France
May 17, 1925

Died
January 09, 1986

Genre


Average rating: 4.07 · 3,685 ratings · 121 reviews · 32 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Practice of Everyday Life

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4.08 avg rating — 3,277 ratings — published 1980 — 21 editions
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The Writing of History

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4.05 avg rating — 108 ratings — published 1975 — 8 editions
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The Possession at Loudun

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3.96 avg rating — 73 ratings — published 1970 — 6 editions
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Heterologies: Discourse on ...

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3.88 avg rating — 50 ratings4 editions
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Practice of Everyday Life: ...

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4.14 avg rating — 58 ratings — published 1980 — 7 editions
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The Mystic Fable, Volume On...

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4.43 avg rating — 40 ratings — published 1982 — 10 editions
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Culture In The Plural

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1974 — 4 editions
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Histoire Et Psychanalyse En...

3.78 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2002 — 6 editions
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Kunst Des Handelns

4.14 avg rating — 7 ratings
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Certeau Reader

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3.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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More books by Michel de Certeau…
“To walk is to lack a place. It is the indefinite process of being absent and in search of a proper. The moving about that the city mutliplies and concentrates makes the city itself an immense social experience of lacking a place -- an experience that is, to be sure, broken up into countless tiny deportations (displacements and walks), compensated for by the relationships and intersections of these exoduses that intertwine and create an urban fabric, and placed under the sign of what ought to be, ultimately, the place but is only a name, the City...a universe of rented spaces haunted by a nowhere or by dreamed-of places.”
Michel de Certeau, The Practice of Everyday Life

“To practice space is thus to repeat the joyful and silent experience of childhood; it is, in a place, to be other and to move toward the other...Kandinsky dreamed of: 'a great city built according to all the rules of architecture and then suddenly shaken by a force that defies all calculation.”
Michel de Certeau, The Practice of Everyday Life

“The long poem of walking manipulates spatial organizations, no matter how panoptic they may be: it is neither foreign to them (it can take place only within them) nor in conformity with them (it does not receive its identity from them). It creates shadows and ambiguities within them. It inserts its multitudinous references and citations into them (social models, cultural mores, personal factors). Within them it is itself the effect of successive encounters and occasions that constantly alter it and make it the other's blazon: in other words, it is like a peddler carrying something surprising, transverse or attractive compared with the usual choice. These diverse aspects provide the basis of a rhetoric. They can even be said to define it.”
Michel de Certeau, The Practice of Everyday Life