Karen Speerstra



Average rating: 3.98 · 88 ratings · 11 reviews · 11 distinct works
The Divine Art of Dying: Ho...

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4.08 avg rating — 37 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Hunab Ku: 77 Sacred Symbols...

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4.20 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2005
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Sophia - The Feminine Face ...

3.91 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2011
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The Green Devotional: Activ...

3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
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Divine Sparks: Collected Wi...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2005
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Color: The Language of Light

2.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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Questions Writers Ask: Wise...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2010 — 2 editions
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The Earthshapers

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1980
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Let's Go Jesus

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1977
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I Believe: A Child's Guide ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1980
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“Focusing techniques that enhance attentiveness (such as mindfulness meditation) help to increase appreciation for the simple blessings of life and banish incompatible thoughts from consciousness. For that reason, celebrating the ordinary is a practice that requires paying attention. Embrace the temporary. Live in the moment. Be grateful for all the little things. Let your eyes linger on what’s right in front of you.”
Karen Speerstra, The Divine Art of Dying: How to Live Well While Dying

“Meister Eckhart said it this way: “The eye with which I see God is the same eye with which God sees me.” Some call this the Buddha Eye. If we haven’t celebrated the ordinary before dying, paying attention at life’s end may require a seismic shift in consciousness that only comes from intentional practice. When we acknowledge the nearness of death and when we have the courage to embrace living fully while dying, then it will be easier to celebrate every ordinary event, discovery, conversation, or gift as a window into the Divine.”
Karen Speerstra, The Divine Art of Dying: How to Live Well While Dying

“The Tao of Dying:                                  In letting go                                  There is gain.                                  In giving up,                                  There is advancement. Letting go of control makes room for the gift of interdependence. Letting go of dreams makes room for ordinary moments of grace. Letting go of replicating past experiences makes room for tomorrow’s surprises. Letting go of self-sufficiency makes room for discovering vulnerabilities previously unknown. Ira Byock says he’s learned through his patients’ dying stories “that people can become stronger and more whole as physical weakness becomes overwhelming and life itself wanes.” Letting go makes room for something new.”
Karen Speerstra, The Divine Art of Dying: How to Live Well While Dying



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