Colin Wright

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Colin Wright

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Born
in Walnut Creek, CA, The United States
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May 2009

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In philosophy, “first principles” refer to something like foundational truths. They are assumptions we can safely make about the way of things, with all of the secondary suppositions and postulations stripped away. The term is similar when applied to the world of formal logic. There are a lot of arguments you could make that rely […] Read more of this blog post »
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Published on May 25, 2018 05:56 • 20 views
Average rating: 3.65 · 2,827 ratings · 220 reviews · 84 distinct worksSimilar authors
How to Travel Full Time

3.57 avg rating — 449 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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Start a Freedom Business

3.49 avg rating — 316 ratings — published 2011
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Some Thoughts About Relatio...

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4.03 avg rating — 209 ratings — published 2015
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Act Accordingly

3.73 avg rating — 313 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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My Exile Lifestyle

3.44 avg rating — 254 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
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How to be Remarkable

3.36 avg rating — 111 ratings2 editions
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Considerations

3.88 avg rating — 93 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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How to Be Remarkable

3.45 avg rating — 84 ratings — published 2011
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Networking Awesomely

3.36 avg rating — 85 ratings — published 2010 — 2 editions
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Iceland India Interstate

3.70 avg rating — 107 ratings — published 2012 — 4 editions
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More of Colin's books…
“You sell off the kingdom piece by piece and trade it for a horse that will take you anywhere.”
Colin Wright, My Exile Lifestyle

“Travel can be even better than what you see on TV, but that sense of awe doesn’t stem from being on the biggest yacht or staying in the nicest hotel or finding the perfect, most picturesque cabin. It comes from discovering a part of yourself you didn’t know was there. It comes from seeing the world from a new angle. It comes from meeting new people, experiencing new things, and gasping at the knowledge that you could have gone your whole life never having seen or tried or done any of it.”
Colin Wright, How to Travel Full Time

“YOU FIRST When entering into relationships, we have a tendency to bend. We bend closer to one another, because regardless of what type of relationship it might be — romantic, business, friendship — there’s a reason you’re bringing that other person into your life, and that means the load is easier to carry if you carry it together, both bending toward the center. I picture people in relationships as two trees, leaning toward one another. Over time, as the relationship solidifies, you both become more comfortable bending, and as such bend farther, eventually resting trunk to trunk. You support each other and are stronger because of the shared strength of your root system and entwined branches. Double-tree power! But there’s a flaw in this mode of operation. Once you’ve spent some time leaning on someone else, if they disappear — because of a breakup, a business upset, a death, a move, an argument — you’re all that’s left, and far weaker than when you started. You’re a tree leaning sideways; the second foundation that once supported you is…gone. This is a big part of why the ending of particularly strong relationships can be so disruptive. When your support system presupposes two trunks — two people bearing the load, and divvying up the responsibilities; coping with the strong winds and hailstorms of life — it can be shocking and uncomfortable and incredibly difficult to function as an individual again; to be just a solitary tree, alone in the world, dealing with it all on your own. A lone tree needn’t be lonely, though. It’s most ideal, in fact, to grow tall and strong, straight up, with many branches. The strength of your trunk — your character, your professional life, your health, your sense of self — will help you cope with anything the world can throw at you, while your branches — your myriad interests, relationships, and experiences — will allow you to reach out to other trees who are likewise growing up toward the sky, rather than leaning and becoming co-dependent. Relationships of this sort, between two equally strong, independent people, tend to outlast even the most intertwined co-dependencies. Why? Because neither person worries that their world will collapse if the other disappears. It’s a relationship based on the connections between two people, not co-dependence. Being a strong individual first alleviates a great deal of jealousy, suspicion, and our innate desire to capture or cage someone else for our own benefit. Rather than worrying that our lives will end if that other person disappears, we know that they’re in our lives because they want to be; their lives won’t end if we’re not there, either. Two trees growing tall and strong, their branches intertwined, is a far sturdier image than two trees bent and twisted, tying themselves into uncomfortable knots to wrap around one another, desperately trying to prevent the other from leaving. You can choose which type of tree to be, and there’s nothing inherently wrong with either model; we all have different wants, needs, and priorities. But if you’re aiming for sturdier, more resilient relationships, it’s a safe bet that you’ll have better options and less drama if you focus on yourself and your own growth, first. Then reach out and connect with others who are doing the same.”
Colin Wright, Considerations

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