John Jay

John Jay


Born
in New York City, New York, The United States
December 12, 1745

Died
May 17, 1829

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American statesman, Patriot, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, diplomat signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, 2nd Governor of New York and the first Chief Justice of the United States.

He was grandfather of John Jay, an American lawyer and diplomat to Austria-Hungary (1869-1875).

Besides his grandson, there are other writers with this name.

Average rating: 4.06 · 30,599 ratings · 670 reviews · 140 distinct works
The Federalist Papers

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4.06 avg rating — 30,321 ratings — published 1787 — 500 editions
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Federalist no. 5

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Federalist no. 4

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Federalist no. 2

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Abraham Lincoln: A History

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Federalist no. 3

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Jay's Treaty

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Modern Approaches to Discre...

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Address to the People of Gr...

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An Address to the People of...

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More books by John Jay…
“Distrust naturally creates distrust, and by nothing is good will and kind conduct more speedily changed.”
John Jay, The Federalist Papers

“Among the many objects to which a wise and free people find it necessary to direct their attention, that of providing for their safety seems to be the first.”
John Jay, The Federalist Papers

“The wise and the good never form the majority of any large society and it seldom happens that their measures are uniformly adopted.... [All that wise and good men can do is] to persevere in doing their duty to their country and leave the consequences to him who made men only; neither elated by success, however great, nor discouraged by disappointments however frequent or mortifying.”
John Jay