Graham E. Fuller

Graham E. Fuller


Born
The United States
Genre


Graham Fuller is an author and a political analyst. He has worked for the United States Central Intelligence Agency, the National Intelligence Council, and Rand Corporation.

Average rating: 3.8 · 1,687 ratings · 244 reviews · 28 distinct worksSimilar authors
A World Without Islam

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A Spymaster's Secrets of Le...

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How to Learn a Foreign Lang...

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The New Turkish Republic: T...

3.28 avg rating — 67 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
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The Future of Political Islam

3.11 avg rating — 46 ratings — published 2003 — 5 editions
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Turkey and the Arab Spring:...

4.11 avg rating — 46 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
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Breaking Faith: A novel of ...

4.23 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
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A Sense Of Siege: The Geopo...

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3.53 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 1995 — 2 editions
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The Arab Shi'a: The Forgott...

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3.44 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 1999 — 5 editions
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Three Truths and a Lie: A M...

4.38 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
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“❝Washington — perhaps as many global powers have done in the past — uses what I might call the “immaculate conception” theory of crises abroad. That is, we believe we are essentially out there, just minding our own business, trying to help make the world right, only to be endlessly faced with a series of spontaneous, nasty challenges from abroad to which we must react. There is not the slightest consideration that perhaps US policies themselves may have at least contributed to a series of unfolding events. This presents a huge paradox: how can America on the one hand pride itself on being the world’s sole global superpower, with over seven hundred military bases abroad and the Pentagon’s huge global footprint, and yet, on the other hand, be oblivious to and unacknowledging of the magnitude of its own role — for better or for worse — as the dominant force charting the course of world events? This Alice-in-Wonderland delusion affects not just policy makers, but even the glut of think tanks that abound in Washington. In what may otherwise often be intelligent analysis of a foreign situation, the focus of each study is invariably the other country, the other culture, the negative intentions of other players; the impact of US actions and perceptions are quite absent from the equation. It is hard to point to serious analysis from mainstream publications or think tanks that address the role of the United States itself in helping create current problems or crises, through policies of omission or commission. We’re not even talking about blame here; we’re addressing the logical and self-evident fact that the actions of the world’s sole global superpower have huge consequences in the unfolding of international politics. They require examination.”
Graham E. Fuller, A World Without Islam

“The west, and especially the United States, has shown no serious or sustained interest in the Middle East until the last half century. We tend to be comfortably ignorant of the history of Western interventionism in the region over centuries — or even over a millennium. We are only superficially aware of Middle Eastern critiques of Western policies that touch on oil, finances, political intervention, Western-sponsored coups, Western support for pro-Western dictators, and carte blanche American support for Israel in the complex Palestinian problem — which, after all, had its roots not in Islam, but in Western persecution and butchery of European Jews. European powers have also exported their local quarrels and parleyed them into two world wars that were fought out partly on Middle Eastern soil, as was much of the Cold War as well. All this suggests that many other causative factors are at work that have at least as much explanatory power for the current turmoil as does “Islam.”

It is not simply a matter of “blaming the West” as some readers might rush to suggest here. I argue that deeper geopolitical factors have created numerous confrontational factors between the East and the West that predate Islam, continued with Islam and around Islam, and may be inherent in the territorial imperatives and geopolitical outlook of any states that occupy those areas, regardless of religion.”
Graham E. Fuller, A World Without Islam

“Governments often keep their populace in permanent states of vigilance or anxiety against foreign enemies as a control mechanism—the politics of fear.”
Graham E. Fuller, Turkey and the Arab Spring: Leadership in the Middle East

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