C. Wright Mills


Born
in Waco, Texas, The United States
August 28, 1917

Died
March 20, 1962

Website

Genre

Influences


American sociologist. Mills is best remembered for his 1959 book The Sociological Imagination in which he lays out a view of the proper relationship between biography and history, theory and method in sociological scholarship. He is also known for studying the structures of power and class in the U.S. in his book The Power Elite. Mills was concerned with the responsibilities of intellectuals in post-World War II society, and advocated public, political engagement over uninterested observation.

Mills died from a heart attack on March 20, 1962.

Average rating: 4.1 · 4,438 ratings · 207 reviews · 31 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Sociological Imagination

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4.15 avg rating — 2,105 ratings — published 1959 — 25 editions
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The Power Elite

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4.12 avg rating — 1,065 ratings — published 1956 — 12 editions
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White Collar: The American ...

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3.98 avg rating — 200 ratings — published 1951 — 11 editions
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The Marxists

3.60 avg rating — 63 ratings — published 1962 — 7 editions
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Power, Politics and People:...

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4.18 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 1963 — 2 editions
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Listen, Yankee:  The Revolu...

3.88 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 1960 — 3 editions
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The Politics of Truth: Sele...

4.05 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2008 — 7 editions
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Letters and Autobiographica...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2000 — 7 editions
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The Causes of World War Three

3.42 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1976 — 3 editions
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Images of Man: The Classic ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1960
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More books by C. Wright Mills…
“Let every man be his own methodologist, let every man be his own theorist”
C. Wright Mills, The Sociological Imagination

“Freedom is not merely the opportunity to do as one pleases; neither is it merely the opportunity to choose between set alternatives. Freedom is, first of all, the chance to formulate the available choices, to argue over them -- and then, the opportunity to choose.”
C. Wright Mills

“People with advantages are loath to believe that they just happen to be people with advantages.”
C. Wright Mills