Donald Phillip Verene


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Average rating: 3.93 · 104 ratings · 12 reviews · 39 distinct worksSimilar authors
Hegel's Absolute: An Introd...

3.75 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
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Vico's Science of Imagination

3.78 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1991 — 2 editions
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Vico And Joyce

3.71 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1987 — 2 editions
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Knowledge of Things Human a...

4.50 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
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Philosophy and the Return t...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1997
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Speculative Philosophy

3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2009 — 4 editions
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The Art of Humane Education...

3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2002
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Hegel's Recollection: A Stu...

4.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1985 — 3 editions
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James Joyce and the Philoso...

3.29 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2016 — 4 editions
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Sexual Love and Western Mor...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1972 — 4 editions
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More books by Donald Phillip Verene…
“Vico is Joycean in that he is always forcing the reader to comprehend the double meaning or double truth of the words upon which he structures the new science. Joyce does this through puns. Vico does it through ambiguity. Ambiguity is a form of fallacy in ordinary logic, a specific instance of which is equivocation, or using a word in two senses. No argument is valid that changes the meaning of its terms in its course. In the doctrine of the syllogism this is known as the fallacy of four terms. But ambiguity is the key to poetical meaning and to much of oration. The orator will play on the various meanings of words to draw forth for his hearers a central point.”
Donald Phillip Verene, Knowledge of Things Human and Divine: Vico’s New Science and "Finnegans Wake"

“Vico’s terminology follows the principle of his oration Study Methods: to balance the moderns against the ancients. The reader is asked to have Joyce’s ‘‘two thinks at a time’’ (FW 583.7), to move between the modern and Vico’s meaning. Vico does not simply replace modern meanings with his own original ones. He repeatedly faces the reader with both.”
Donald Phillip Verene, Knowledge of Things Human and Divine: Vico’s New Science and "Finnegans Wake"

“It is in the connection between the philosophical concern with eternal necessity and the philological concern with the things produced by choice and human will that the ‘‘newness’’ of Vico’s new science lies. Vico’s claims in the De constantia are another way to see how he is a philosopher in only a general sense. Vico is in fact a jurisprudent whose subject is ‘‘the jurisprudence of the human race’’ and whose ‘‘constancy’’ includes philosophy. Vico is the jurisprudent first and the philosopher second. Vico’s concern, extending from the Universal Law to the New Science, is to provide a constancy of judgment, not as a means by which we can interpret a given body of law but as a way in which we can interpret the ‘‘law of the nations’’ itself. Constancy is not simply the consistency of making the same judgment over and over. It requires the knowledge and balancing of opposites as they bear on particular human events. ‘‘counsel and constancy. ordination of omen, onus and orbit. distribution of danger, duty and destiny. polar principles’’ (FW 271.R 1–13).”
Donald Phillip Verene, Knowledge of Things Human and Divine: Vico’s New Science and "Finnegans Wake"
tags: joyce, vico



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