McKenzie Wark


Born
in Australia
January 01, 1961

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Average rating: 3.77 · 1,308 ratings · 147 reviews · 36 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Beach Beneath the Stree...

3.85 avg rating — 236 ratings — published 2011 — 7 editions
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A Hacker Manifesto

3.82 avg rating — 202 ratings — published 2004 — 10 editions
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Gamer Theory

3.32 avg rating — 156 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
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Molecular Red: Theory for t...

3.58 avg rating — 110 ratings — published 2015 — 7 editions
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The Spectacle of Disintegra...

4.03 avg rating — 65 ratings — published 2013 — 7 editions
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General Intellects: Twenty-...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 47 ratings4 editions
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50 Years of Recuperation of...

3.80 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 2008 — 2 editions
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Dispositions

3.75 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2002
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Virtual Geography: Living w...

3.75 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1994 — 5 editions
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Telesthesia: Communication,...

3.36 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
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“In some ways, the great danger for this commodified universe is our boredom with it ... There is this sort of dialectic that you could tease out, that even in this overdeveloped late-capitalist world, that boredom was still this kind of critical energy that you could work on and try to theorize and then act on, to find other kinds of belonging, other kinds of desire, other kinds of life.”
McKenzie Wark

“In Japan itself it seemed as if theory had been absorbed the same way Japanese media culture absorbed everything else—by turning it into a spectacular subcultural style.”
McKenzie Wark, General Intellects: Twenty-One Thinkers for the Twenty First Century

“The preferred worlds to simulate were either sci-fi or Edo-period Japan, as if the two breaks of the Meiji restoration (1868) and the occupation (1945) had not happened. Azuma links simulation to the practice of détournement or the fan-based making of derivative works, which “official” products then borrow from in turn: “the products of otaku culture are born into a chain of infinite imitations and piracy” (O26). Simulacra thus float free from both the notion of an historical time and from the authoring of original works.”
McKenzie Wark, General Intellects: Twenty-One Thinkers for the Twenty First Century

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