Kathleen Thompson Norris


Born
in San Francisco, CA, The United States
July 16, 1880

Died
January 18, 1966

Website


Educated at the University of California, Kathleen married Charles Norris, brother of the author Frank Norris, in 1909. She was a prolific author, producing over 80 novels in addition to numerous short stories and articles. Norris was a regular contributor to leading magazines such as Atlantic and Ladies' Home Journal. Her first novel, Lost Sunrise, appeared in 1909 and was immediately popular. By the end of her career her books had sold over ten million copies and made her the highest paid female author of her day.

Average rating: 3.83 · 2,600 ratings · 236 reviews · 109 distinct worksSimilar authors
Mother

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3.95 avg rating — 1,428 ratings — published 1911 — 55 editions
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Sisters

3.40 avg rating — 326 ratings — published 2004 — 44 editions
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The Heart of Rachael

3.69 avg rating — 106 ratings — published 1916 — 44 editions
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The Story of Julia Page

4.03 avg rating — 31 ratings — published 1915 — 30 editions
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The Rich Mrs. Burgoyne

3.67 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 1912 — 24 editions
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Wife For Sale

3.87 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 1940 — 2 editions
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The Beloved Woman

3.93 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 2001 — 37 editions
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Saturday's Child

3.90 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 1914 — 34 editions
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The Venables

4.53 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 1941 — 4 editions
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Poor, Dear Margaret Kirby

3.79 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 1913 — 11 editions
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More books by Kathleen Thompson Norris…
“Just the knowledge that a good book is awaiting one at the end of a long day makes that day happier. ”
Kathleen Thompson Norris, Hands Full of Living

“Why, the club was just the quietest place in the world, a place where a woman could run in to brush her hair and wash her hands, and change her library book, and have a cup of tea.”
Kathleen Thompson Norris, Saturday's Child

“Now I know what makes you so different from other women," said John Tenison, when he and Margaret were alone. "It's having that wonderful mother! She--she--well, she's one woman in a million; I don't have to tell you that! It's something to thank God for, a mother like that; it's a privilege to know her. I've been watching her all day, and I've been wondering what SHE gets out of it--that was what puzzled me; but now, just now, I've found out! This morning, thinking what her life is, I couldn't see what REPAID her, do you see? What made up to her for the unending, unending effort, and sacrifice, the pouring out of love and sympathy and help--year after year after year..."
He hesitated, but Margaret did not speak.
"You know," he went on musingly, "in these days, when women just serenely ignore the question of children, or at most, as a special concession, bring up one or two--just the one or two whose expenses can be comfortably met!--there's something magnificent in a woman like your mother, who begins eight destinies instead of one! She doesn't strain and chafe to express herself through the medium of poetry or music or the stage, but she puts her whole splendid philosophy into her nursery--launches sound little bodies and minds that have their first growth cleanly and purely about her knees. Responsibility--that's what these other women say they are afraid of! But it seems to me there's no responsibility like that of decreeing that young lives simply SHALL NOT BE. Why, what good is learning, or elegance of manner, or painfully acquired fineness of speech, and taste and point of view, if you are not going to distill it into the growing plants, the only real hope we have in the world! You know, Miss Paget," his smile was very sweet in the half darkness, "there's a higher tribunal than the social tribunal of this world, after all; and it seems to me that a woman who stands there, as your mother will, with a forest of new lives about her, and a record like hers, will--will find she has a Friend at court!" he finished whimsically.”
Kathleen Thompson Norris
tags: mother

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