Jeffrey Rosen



Average rating: 3.74 · 1,247 ratings · 190 reviews · 17 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Supreme Court: The Pers...

3.67 avg rating — 622 ratings — published 2007 — 13 editions
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Privacy, Property, and Free...

4.24 avg rating — 125 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Louis D. Brandeis: American...

3.75 avg rating — 166 ratings — published 2016 — 7 editions
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William Howard Taft: The Am...

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3.74 avg rating — 155 ratings — published 2012 — 4 editions
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The Unwanted Gaze: The Dest...

3.59 avg rating — 46 ratings — published 2000 — 6 editions
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Constitution 3.0: Freedom a...

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3.69 avg rating — 42 ratings — published 2011 — 6 editions
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Conversations with RBG: Rut...

4.04 avg rating — 26 ratings — published 2019 — 5 editions
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The Most Democratic Branch:...

3.19 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2006 — 5 editions
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The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming...

3.27 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 2004 — 7 editions
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Microsoft Powershell, VBScr...

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3.47 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2009 — 8 editions
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“Before Sept. 11, the idea that Americans would voluntarily agree to live their lives under the gaze of a network of biometric surveillance cameras, peering at them in government buildings, shopping malls, subways and stadiums, would have seemed unthinkable, a dystopian fantasy of a society that had surrendered privacy and anonymity.”
Jeffrey Rosen

“Like Jefferson, Brandeis believed that the greatest threat to our constitutional liberties was an uneducated citizenry, and that democracy could not survive both ignorant and free. And”
Jeffrey Rosen, Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet

“Zimmern’s definition of the Greek conception of leisure: namely, the time away from business when the citizens could develop their faculties through the art and contemplation that were indispensable for full participation in public affairs. “The Greek word for unemployment is ‘scholê,’ which means ‘leisure’: while for business he has no better word than the negative ‘ascholia,’ which means ‘absence of leisure.’ The hours and weeks of unemployment he regards as the best and most natural part of his life,” Zimmern wrote. “Leisure is the mother of art and contemplation, as necessity is the mother of the technical devices we call ‘inventions.’”71”
Jeffrey Rosen, Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet



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