John Seabrook


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John Seabrook has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1993. The author of several books including Nobrow, he has taught narrative nonfiction writing at Princeton University. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Listen: How to Make a Pop Hit

On Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

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Published on October 22, 2015 10:43 • 122 views
Average rating: 3.84 · 3,508 ratings · 454 reviews · 11 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Song Machine: Inside th...

3.94 avg rating — 2,933 ratings — published 2015 — 13 editions
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Nobrow: The Culture of Mark...

3.30 avg rating — 446 ratings — published 2000 — 8 editions
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Flash of Genius

3.68 avg rating — 63 ratings — published 2008
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Deeper: Adventures on the Net

3.20 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 1997 — 5 editions
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La fábrica de canciones: Có...

4.18 avg rating — 11 ratings
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The Invisible Designer

3.06 avg rating — 16 ratings2 editions
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Hitmaskinen - Låtfabriken i...

3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings
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FABRICA DE CANCIONES,LA

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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Hits ! (Culture sonore)

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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The Spinach King

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“there are only so many times you can listen to the guitar solo in Pink Floyd’s “Comfortably Numb” without going a little numb yourself,”
John Seabrook, The Song Machine: Inside the Hit Factory

“The very first hit factory was T.B. Harms, a Tin Pan Alley publishing company overseen by Max Dreyfus. With staff writers like Jerome Kern, George and Ira Gershwin, Cole Porter, and Richard Rodgers, T.B. Harms was the dominant publisher of popular music in the early twentieth century. Dreyfus called his writers “the boys” and installed pianos for them to compose on around the office on West Twenty-Eighth, the street that gave Tin Pan Alley its name, allegedly for the tinny-sounding pianos passersby heard from the upper-story windows of the row houses. The sheet-music sellers also employed piano players in their street-level stores, who would perform the Top 40 of the 1920s for browsing customers.”
John Seabrook, The Song Machine: Inside the Hit Factory

“on the Internet, shelf space is infinite,”
John Seabrook, The Song Machine: Inside the Hit Factory

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