Paul Virilio


Born
in Paris, France
January 04, 1932

Website

Genre


Paul Virilio is a cultural theorist and urbanist. He is best known for his writings about technology as it has developed in relation to speed and power, with diverse references to architecture, the arts, the city and the military.

Average rating: 3.84 · 2,986 ratings · 203 reviews · 85 distinct worksSimilar authors
Speed and Politics (Semiotext

by
3.89 avg rating — 279 ratings — published 1977 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Information Bomb

3.72 avg rating — 284 ratings — published 1998 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
War and Cinema: The Logisti...

3.91 avg rating — 254 ratings — published 1986 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Aesthetics of Disappear...

by
3.93 avg rating — 208 ratings — published 1980 — 10 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Administration of Fear

3.79 avg rating — 183 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Sky

by
3.83 avg rating — 185 ratings — published 1995 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Art and Fear

by
3.58 avg rating — 169 ratings — published 2002 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Pure War (Semiotext

by
4.02 avg rating — 152 ratings — published 1984 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ground Zero

by
3.44 avg rating — 97 ratings — published 2002
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Vision Machine

3.95 avg rating — 88 ratings — published 1989 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Paul Virilio…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“There are eyes everywhere. No blind spot left. What shall we dream of when everything becomes visible? We'll dream of being blind.”
Paul Virilio

“The invention of the ship was also the invention of the shipwreck”
Paul Virilio

“With the industrial proliferation of visual and audiovisual prostheses and unrestrained use of instantaneous-transmission equipment from earliest childhood onwards, we now routinely see the encoding of increasingly elaborate mental images together with a steady decline in retention rates and recall. In other words we are looking at the rapid collapse of mnemonic consolidation. This collapse seems only natural, if one remembers a contrario that seeing, and its spatio-temporal organization, precede gesture and speech and their coordination in knowing, recognizing, making known (as images of our thoughts), our thoughts themselves and cognitive functions, which are never ever passive.”
Paul Virilio, The Vision Machine



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Paul to Goodreads.