A. Manette Ansay


Born
in Lapeer, Michigan, The United States
January 01, 1964

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A. Manette Ansay grew up in Wisconsin among 67 cousins and over 200 second cousins. She is the author of six novels, including Good Things I Wish You (July, 2009), Vinegar Hill, an Oprah Book Club Selection, and Midnight Champagne, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, as well as a short story collection, Read This and Tell Me What It Says, and a memoir, Limbo. Her awards include a National Endowment for the Arts Grant, a Pushcart Prize, the Nelson Algren Prize, and two Great Lakes Book Awards. She lives with her daughter in Florida, where she teaches in the MFA program at the University of Miami.

Average rating: 3.4 · 33,683 ratings · 1,751 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
Vinegar Hill

3.39 avg rating — 28,167 ratings — published 1994 — 35 editions
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Blue Water

3.48 avg rating — 1,924 ratings — published 2006 — 19 editions
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Midnight Champagne

3.33 avg rating — 1,247 ratings — published 1999 — 13 editions
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Good Things I Wish You

3.15 avg rating — 868 ratings — published 2009 — 14 editions
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Sister

3.58 avg rating — 647 ratings — published 1996 — 16 editions
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River Angel

3.53 avg rating — 414 ratings — published 1998 — 12 editions
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Limbo

3.74 avg rating — 391 ratings — published 2006 — 12 editions
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Read This and Tell Me What ...

3.75 avg rating — 138 ratings — published 1995 — 4 editions
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More books by A. Manette Ansay…
“Infatuation is the inciting incident. Maybe it goes somewhere, maybe it doesn't, but you can't have a story without it. Love is the story itself, the thing we carry with us after the mountains are gone.”
A. Manette Ansay, Good Things I Wish You

“If we just had some time to ourselves, we could talk to each other the way we used to. Maybe about nothing in particular at first, but even that would be a start.”
A. Manette Ansay, Vinegar Hill

“Each piano is unique. Each feels different beneath your hand and yields a new geography of sound. Each room or hall accepts that sound in a completely different way, and if, within that room or hall, the piano is moved, the sound will change, as it will if the hall is full of people in thick winter coats, or half full of people in light summer dresses. You must adjust your touch, your tone, your range; you must LISTEN, for even the most familiar passages can become unfamiliar, challenging, strange.”
A. Manette Ansay, Limbo

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