Daniel P. Mannix


Born
October 27, 1911

Died
January 29, 1997


Daniel Pratt Mannix IV was best known as an American author and journalist. His life was remarkably different from other writers of his generation. His career included times as a side show performer, magician, trainer of eagles and film maker.

The Grest Zadma was a stage name Mannix used as a magician. He also entertained as a sword swallower and fire eater in a traveling carnival sideshow. Magazine articles about these experiences, co-written with his wife, became very popular in 1944 and 1945.

As an author Mannix covered a wide variety of subject matter. His more than 25 books ranged from fictional animal stories for children, the natural history of animals, and adventurous accounts about hunting big game to sensational adult n
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Average rating: 4.07 · 2,336 ratings · 217 reviews · 32 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Fox and The Hound

4.25 avg rating — 960 ratings — published 1967 — 7 editions
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Freaks

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 286 ratings — published 1976 — 8 editions
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The Way of the Gladiator

3.96 avg rating — 315 ratings — published 1958 — 4 editions
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The History of Torture

3.83 avg rating — 178 ratings — published 1964 — 9 editions
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The Hell Fire Club

3.69 avg rating — 157 ratings — published 1961 — 8 editions
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Memoirs of a Sword Swallower

4.24 avg rating — 110 ratings — published 1988 — 2 editions
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The Wolves of Paris

3.99 avg rating — 78 ratings — published 1978 — 6 editions
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Step Right Up!

4.26 avg rating — 50 ratings — published 1950 — 5 editions
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The Killers

4.48 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 1968 — 4 editions
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Black Cargoes: A History of...

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3.85 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 1962 — 9 editions
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More books by Daniel P. Mannix…
“One such monster lived around 600 B.C. and was the slave of a Greek nobleman named Iadmon who lived on Samos. This unfortunate was a hunchback described as having "an enormous head with slit eyes, a long, misshaped countenance, a large mouth and bowed legs." A servant girl meeting him asked in horror, "Are you a baboon?" Because he was cut off from humanity by his revolting appearance, this monster made friends with animals. He told numerous short tales with animal heroes illustrating the weaknesses of people. His stories were so biting and his looks so disgusting that he was finally killed by a mob. His name was Aesop.”
Daniel P. Mannix, Freaks

“The people went mad over these big games and didn’t care if Caesar became dictator or not as long as he kept them amused. But”
Daniel P. Mannix, Those About to Die, or The Way of the Gladiator

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